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Full text of "Neighborhood analysis, Albemarle, North Carolina"



North C a State Library 

Raleigh 

N. C. 

Doc. 



NEIGHBORHOOD ANALYSIS 




ALBEMARLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



ABSTRACT 



TITLE 
AUTHOR 

DATE 

LOCAL 

PLANNING 

AGENCY 

SOURCE OF 
COPIES 



HUD PROJECT 
NUMBER 

SERIES 
NUMBER 

NUMBER OF 
PAGES 

ABSTRACT 



Neighborhood Analysis, Albemarle, North Carolina 

North Carolina Department of Conservation and 
Development, Division of Community Planning, 
Piedmont Area Office, Box 300, Salisbury, N.C. 28144 

April, 1969 

Albemarle Planning Board, Albemarle, North Carolina 



Albemarle City Hall, Albemarle, North Carolina 

Department of Conservation and Development, 
Division of Community Planning, P.O. Box 2719, 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27602 

Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical 
Information, Washington, D. C. 



NCP-76 



One of one 



79 plus 9 maps and Appendix 



The Albemarle Neighborho 
detailed examination of 
socio-economic concomita 
factors and residential 
tural conditions are pre 
by-neighborhood basis, 
families affected by sub 
mined by conducting a 10 
personal interviews of r 
dwellings. Correlations 
with socio-economic ind i 
recommendations for trea 
have been made. 



od Analysis 
phy s ica 1 b 1 
nt s . Var io 
and non-res 
sented on a 
The charact 
standard ho 
% sample su 
e s ident s of 
of phys ica 
ces are pre 
tment of bl 



cons ist s of a 
ight and its 
us environmental 
idential struc- 

ne ighborhood- 
er is t ics of 
using were deter- 
rvey involving 

subs tandard 
1 blight indices 
sented and 
ighted areas 



A major finding of this report includes notice of 
the efforts of governmental agencies and private 
groups to improve the entire community. The out- 
look for progress is excellent. 



NEIGHBORHOOD ANALYSIS 




ALBEMARLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



The preparation of this report was financed In part through an 
urban planning grant from the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, under the provision ol Section 701 ol the Housing 
Act ol 1954, as amended. 



PREPARED FOR 



The City of Albemarle, North Carolina 

James B. Garrison, Mayor 
Jack F. Neel, City Manager 



City Council 

Dr. D. C. Duckworth 
Carlton B. Ho It 
G. T. Rabe, Jr. 
Robert L. Vick 
Elbert L. Whitley 

Planning Board 

Gerald H. Ehringer, Chairman 

E. F. Wilson, Secretary 

J. P. Mauldin 

C. R. Earnhardt 

E . B. Plyler 

Thomas Fatkin 

Cecil Moose 

Ed Underwood 

J . T. Russell , Jr . 

Max Bogle 



TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE BY 



State of North Carolina 

Department of Conservation and Development 

Division of Community Planning 

George J. Monaghan, Administrator 

Piedmont Area Office, Salisbury, N. C. 

*Mathey A. Davis, Director 
Paul L. Trexler, Draftsman 
M. Eileen Antosek, Secretary 

* Responsible for Report 



April, 1969 



Price : $2.00 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/neighborhoodanal1969nort 



Page 

Neighborhood Number: Al 46 

A2 4 7 

FRINGE AREA A3 48 

A4 49 

A5 50 

A6 50 

A7 52 

A8 53 

A9 53 

A9A 54 

A10 54 

All 55 

A12 56 

A13 57 

A14 57 

Evaluation 58 

Current Activities 61 

Sanitation 63 

County Water and Sewer Study 63 

Housing Code 63 

Public Housing 64 

Private Housing 65 

Recreation 66 

Court House and Library 67 

Vocational Workshop 68 

Intercity Governmental Council 68 

Community Improvement Program 69 

Conclusions and Recommendations 71 

Append ix 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



Preface 

Introduction 3 

Methodology 4 

Stanly County Profile 7 

Location 7 

Climate 7 

Agriculture 7 

Industry 8 

Social Assets 8 

General Findings 9 

Fires 9 

Street and Traffic Conditions 11 

Crimes 13 

Education 13 

Library 15 

Health 15 

Welfare 16 

Population Data 18 

Substandard Structures 20 

Mixed Land Use 23 

Characteristics of Families Living in 

Substandard Housing 24 

Neighborhood Number: 1 27 

2 . . . 2 8 

CITY 3 30 

4 31 

5 33 

6 34 

7 36 

8 38 

9 39 

10 41 

11 42 

12 42 

13 44 

14 45 



TABLES 



Number 



Arrests for Crimes against Property, 
Persons and Juvenile Offenses 



We 1 fa re Cases 



Population Trends by Decades, 
Albemarle, Stanly County, North and 
South Albemarle Townships, N. C. .. 

Standard and Substandard Housing by 
Planning Unit and with Percentage . 



Page 

12 
17 

19 
22 



MAPS 

Number 

1 Generalized Existing Land Use and 
Study Areas 

2 Residential Fire Calls 

3 Traffic Volumes 

4 Vehicular Accidents 

5 Crimes - By Residence of Offender ... 

6 Public Assistance Cases 

7 Non-Residential Blighted Areas 

8 Substandard and Negro Housing ....... 

9 Proposed Treatment Areas 



F 


1 1 ows 




Page 




2 




8 




10 




10 


• 


12 
16 




20 
22 
79 



PREFACE 






The Neighborhood Analysis is being prepared for the 
purpose of studying the extent, causes, and concomitant 
social conditions of blight within the community on an 
area-by-area basis. The Town of Albemarle must not be 
afraid to take a good look at itself. An attitude of 
de f ens ivene ss was noted several times during preliminary 
interviews, but this "back-off" attitude was probably 
aroused in those who did not understand that the purpose 
of the analysis is constructive rather than destructive. 
A revelation of faults was not the underlying motive of 
the research — it was more a search for a foundation of 
strengths on which to build and use to correct existing 
problems in the community. No community is exempt from 
problems of blight and the accompanying discomforts and 
disadvantages these problems incur. 



Despite the "this is no worse than anywhere else" 
attitude of some, there is the comforting feeling that 
they were outweighed by the "this is the situation and 
this is what we are doing about it" reactions of others. 
Cooperation and interest of the "power" and the "powerless" 
have made this report comprehensive and enlightening -- 
and hopefully will prove beneficial to all involved. 



Few people have the time or temperament to sit still 
while a lot of talk but nothing constructive is going on. 
Programs and promises that involve mu 1 1 i- sy 1 lab 1 e phrases 
and complicated details have been avoided to make way for 



the simple Language of "a pretty spot dressed up by a 
garden club" or a "dusty road" that is just that. This 
is the language of those interviewed — of those people 
living in blighted areas where education, income and 
health are below the average, and general attitude is 
sometimes rather earthy. 



A progressive community will not turn away from 
those who are "down and out" but rather will attempt to 
remedy an unfortunate situation and redeem itself. 
Awareness of the circumstances surrounding the blighted 
areas of the community plus the plight of those who are 
affected by it must be a goal of this report. 



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the simple language of "a pretty spot dressed up by a 
garden club" or a "dusty road" that is just that. This 
is the language of those interviewed — of those people 
living in blighted areas where education, income and 
health are below the average, and general attitude is 
sometimes rather earthy. 



A progressive community will not turn away from 
those who are "down and out" but rather will attempt to 
remedy an unfortunate situation and redeem itself. 
Awareness of the circumstances surrounding the blighted 
areas of the community plus the plight of those who are 
affected by it must be a goal of this report. 



JA 


-On \ 

-T*T A-14*A ^^>" 


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Pi * 1 'IB-'' , Tm i « - t 


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GENERALIZED 

EXISTING LAND USE 
& STUDY AREAS 

ALBEMARLE 

NORTH CAROLINA 

0" 3000' 




■Ml 






SCALE IN FEET 

LEGEND 
j 1 UNDEVELOPED 


I A " 2 - J'Mfl 

\ a-3 / a-4 A^flnr^sr U^ 


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RESIDENTIAL 
_| SINGLE FAMILY 
| TWO FAMILY OR MORE 

| COMMERCIAL 

H PUBLIC AND SEMI-PUBLIC 

B INDUSTRIAL 

MAP-1 






- 









>-- 



INTRODUCTION 



Blight implies a condition of deterioration and 
deficiency in the quality of economic, physical and social 
environment. It is measured by extent, location and inten- 
sity, and is backed up by statistics and personal inter- 
views. The decaying house, the yard full of junk, the un- 
sanitary ■ s tore , the dusty and rutted road, and the lack of 
pride in the neighborhood are there — in the 28 neighbor- 
hoods -- and unless the community as a whole initiates 
action to do something about these conditions and activates 
methods of immediate improvement — they will not only be 
there but they will grow and spread. 

The Neighborhood Analysis is a study of the city and 
the one-mile perimeter on an area-by-area basis to deter- 
mine the nature, extend and causes of blight. It involves 
the cooperation of various city, county and private agencies 
in the accumulation of data, plus the personal interviews 
of a 10% sample survey of the residents in blighted areas. 



The Neighborhood Analysis determines which parts of 
the city are so deteriorated that they must be completely 
cleared and redeveloped, and which parts can be improved 
and renovated through rehabilitation and conservation. 



The Neighborhood Analysis reveals certain factors which 
determine blight. Some of the more significant are: 



defective structures warranting clearance; 
deteriorated conditions and defects not corrected 

by normal maintenance; 
unsafe, congested, poorly designed, or otherwise 

deficient streets; 
overcrowding and improper location of structures 

on the land ; 
excessive dwelling unit density; 

a high rate of property damage resulting from fires; 
excessive number of welfare cases; 
high rate of major crimes; 
high amount of social diseases; 
lack of skilled labor; 
declining property values with resulting decreasing 

assessed valuations; and 
lack of industrial diversification. 



The Neighborhood Analysis is an integral part of the 
Workable Program for Community Improvement which is a plan 
of action whereby a community combines both public and 
private resources to eliminate and prevent extensions of 
blight. In addition to analyses of problem areas, the 
Neighborhood Analysis gives attention to needed community 
facilities and services and to the elimination of blighting 
influences such as heavy traffic and non- con forming land 
uses. 



METHODOLOGY 



Study areas were delineated along the same lines 
marked off for the Land Development Plan (1965), and data 
carried over from the Land Use Survey was used as a basis 
for determining the percentage of interviews to be taken 
in each area. (See Table VIII, Land Development Plan , 1965) 



A sample survey of the blighted areas was made during 
the summer of 1968. Personal interviews were conducted 
at those dwellings displaying blight and objective observa- 
tions of the physical and social environment were made. 









The Fire Department and Police Department supplied 
information pertinent to each area; other city offices 
furnished data on housing conditions, community facilities, 
streets and utilities; and the Chamber of Commerce made 
comments relative to the general atmosphere of the city. 
The Health Department personnel analyzed the number of 
social diseases and infant deaths and inferred that the 
incidence of these contributors to blight were overall 
rather than localized in certain areas. 

The questions contained on the sample survey sheets 
were answered obligingly. Dwelling units where questions 
were asked were, for the most part, inside the city limits 
rather than in the one-mile perimeter area due to the 
degree of evident blight. (This study is concerned pri- 
marily with those substandard houses inside the city limits 
rather than in the fringe area because the city has imme- 
diate concern over what it already has. Concern for the 
area immediately outside the city stems from the fact that 
these areas will quite probably be annexed in the future.) 

Only 4 of the 28 neighborhoods had Negroes living in 
substandard houses. Neighborhood 12, where most of the 
Negro families are concentrated, had the highest percent- 
age of substandard housing. 



Ninety-two white families and 44 Negro families (475 
persons living in 136 houses) were visited. Females out- 
numbered males in blighted homes (246-229, respectively), 
although in some neighborhoods the numbers were even or 
in favor of males. Many of the houses were occupied by 
widows, grandmothers caring for abandoned children, or 
fatherless families -- as is often the case in blighted 
ne ighborhoods . 

However impersonal the figures may be, the fact 
remains that a close-up study of the blighted areas re- 
vealed the following general conditions: 



the accumulation of abandoned and wrecked cars, wood 
piles, discarded lawnmowers and laundry equipment, 
and assorted rubbish — all in the yards; 

housing with broken steps, sagging porches, leaning 
roofs, missing window panes, limited sanitary 
facilities, and so forth; 

an air of physical, mental, social and economic 
depression that is made even heavier with concern 
for the future. 



STANLY COUNTY PROFILE 

LOCATION 

Stanly County, with Albemarle as its Seat, is located 
in the south central portion of North Carolina. It is 
surrounded by gently rolling hills of the ancient Uwharrie 
Mountain range and is bounded on the east by the Yadkin 
River and on the south by the Rocky River. It is best 
described as an area of "accessible isolation", being near 
large markets and yet not hampered by large industrial 
complexes threatening to smother it. 

Albemarle is 42 miles northeast of Charlotte, 115 
miles southwest of the state capital of Raleigh and 200 
miles west of the North Carolina coast. There are six 
incorporated communities and four unincorporated communities 
in the county. 



CLIMATE 

The county enjoys a mild, healthful climate through- 
out the year, with an annual mean temperature of 50°F and 
an average yearly rainfall of 28 inches. The area has a 
growth season of approximately 200 days and is not subject 
to violent storms or other unusual weather conditions. 



AGRICULTURE 

Though on the edge of the industrial Piedmont Crescent, 
Stanly County is a major agricultural county. Farming is a 
$16,000,000 per year industry. There are 1700 farms in the 
county and average 80 acres each, with a majority being 



owner-operated. Poultry, commercial eggs, beef cattle, 
dairying, soybeans, corn, wheat and small grains are the 
main agricultural enterprises. Stanly leads the state in 
the production of commercial eggs. 



INDUSTRY 

Though textile-oriented through the years, the indus- 
trial complexion is gradually changing as more diversified 
operations come into the area. Major industries in the 
county produce primary aluminum, cotton and synthetic yarns, 
knit products, ladies sportswear, childrens' lingerie, 
ladies hosiery, furniture, brick, clay and light weather 
aggregate products, flour and feed, printed materials, and 
wood and metal products. 



SOCIAL ASSETS 
E d_u cation : 

Library : 

Chur ch e s : 
Recreation: 



From grammar school through college 
(Pfeiffer College). 

Contains over 50,000 volumes; main library 
in Albemarle with branches in Badin, Norwood, 
and Kingville communities, plus a bookmobile. 

All major denominations represented. 

"Playground of the Lower Piedmont"; Morrow 
Mountain State Park for fishing, boating, 
swimming, picnicking, hiking, camping; rivers 
for fishing, boating; golfing; hunting; and 
so forth. 



Game in abundance -- deer 



» q 



ua il and duck. 



Recreation Director supervises operation of 
six city pa rk s . 



V 



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A-3 



owner-operated. Poultry, commercial eggs, beef cattle, 
dairying, soybeans, corn, wheat and small grains are the 
main agricultural enterprises. Stanly leads the state in 
the production of commercial eggs. 



INDUSTRY 

Though textile-oriented through the years, the indus- 
trial complexion is gradually changing as more diversified 
operations come into the area. Major industries in the 
county produce primary aluminum, cotton and synthetic yarns, 
knit products, ladies sportswear, childrens 1 lingerie, 
ladies hosiery, furniture, brick, clay and light weather 
aggregate products, flour and feed, printed materials, and 
wood and metal products. 



SOCIAL ASSETS 



E duca t ion 



Chur ch e s 



Recreat ion 



From grammar school through college 
(Pfeiffer College). 

Contains over 50,000 volumes; main library 
in Albemarle with branches in Badin, Norwood, 
and Kingville communities, plus a bookmobile. 

All major denominations represented. 

"Playground of the Lower Piedmont"; Morrow 
Mountain State Park for fishing, boating, 
swimming, picnicking, hiking, camping; rivers 
for fishing, boating; golfing; hunting; and 
so forth. 

Game in abundance -- deer, quail and duck. 

Recreation Director supervises operation of 
six city parks. 



RESIDENTIAL FIRE CALLS 




ALBEMARLE 

NORTH CAROLINA 



SCALE IN FEET 




IEGEN 
ONE RESIDENTIAL FIRE CALL 



MAP-2 



Organ iza t ions 



Health 
Facilities 



Jaycees, Rotary, Lions, Optimist, Civitan, 
Woman's Club, Junior Woman's Club, Home 
Demonstration Clubs, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, 
Hi-Y, Tri-Hi-Y, organized athletics. 



Stanly County Hospital (opened in 1950), has 
a capacity of 134 beds. More than 20 
practicing physicians and specialists in 
the area . 

Stanly County Health Center contains modern 
clinical equipment and is staffed by a 
medical doctor and registered nurses. Mental 
Health Clinic has part-time staffing from 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 



GENERAL FINDINGS 

Included in the following are those elements which 
most directly affect the degree of blight in Albemarle. 
They are essentially interrelated and indicate that there 
are certain geographical areas, rather easily defined, 
that should receive priority remedial treatment. This, 
however, will be discussed in more detail in a later 
sect ion . 



FIRES 

Two-hundred and seven fire calls were answered in 
1967, the majority of which were: residences (60); car 
fires (41); commercial (42); grass fires (19). As might 
be expected, most fires involving cars and commercial uses 
occurred in those areas which attract concentrations of 



shoppers, i.e., the central business district, the commer- 
cialized portion of East Main Street, etc. Residential and 
grass fire calls were most evident in Neighborhoods 12, 7, 
and 2. One-hundred and forty calls were transferred to rural 
fire departments. 

Some major causes of fires were: flooded oil heaters 
(10); careless smoking (22); children playing with matches 
(11); unknown causes (13); defective carburetors (22); 
defective wiring (24); false alarms (malicious, 18; acci- 
denta 1 , 15). 

Fire losses in the city for 1967 amounted to $32,156.52 
— a per capita loss of $2.62. The total value of property 
at risk was $58,678,253.00; insurance on property at risk 
was $41 , 242 ,511 . 00 . 

The Annual Fire Department Report for 1967 indicated 
that training has been regular, equipment has been maintain- 
ed in good condition, and there has been no turn-over in 
p er s onne 1 , 

Volunteer Fire Departments answer calls outside the 
corporate limits. There are, however, mutual aid agree- 
ments between City and County units. Records of the number 
of calls, property at risk, or causes were not available 
for the fringe area neighborhoods. 



10 




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\ 2800 
V 26004 

V-€ - 




shoppers, i.e., the central business district, the commer- 
cialized portion of East Main Street, etc. Residential and 
grass fire calls were most evident in Neighborhoods 12, 7, 
and 2. One-hundred and forty calls were transferred to rural 
fire departments. 

Some major causes of fires were: flooded oil heaters 
(10); careless smoking (22); children playing with matches 
(11); unknown causes (13); defective carburetors (22); 
defective wiring (24); false alarms (malicious, 18; acci- 
denta 1 , 15). 

Fire losses in the city for 1967 amounted to $32,156.52 
-- a per capita loss of $2.62. The total value of property 
at risk was $58,678,253.00; insurance on property at risk 
was $41 ,242 ,511 .00. 

The Annual Fire Department Report for 1967 indicated 
that training has been regular, equipment has been maintain- 
ed in good condition, and there has been no turn-over in 
per s onne 1 . 

Volunteer Fire Departments answer calls outside the 
corporate limits. There are, however, mutual aid agree- 
ments between City and County units. Records of the number 
of calls, property at risk, or causes were not available 
for the fringe area neighborhoods. 



10 



^•fT 




Average Daily 

Traffic volume 

1962 & 1967 



ALBEMARLE 
NORTH CAROLINA 



SCALE IN FEET 




LEGEND 
1962 AVG DAILY 24 hr TRAFFIC VOLUMES 
1967 AVG DAILY 24 hr. TRAFFIC VOLUMES 



MAP-3 



J f 



A-l 



t 



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(U \ a- 2 



) — 



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A-3 



L • "V. 



V 



VEHICULAR ACCIDENTS 




ALBEMARLE 

NORTH CAROLINA 



SCALE IN FEET 




One dot equals one occ 

LEGEND 
1966 ACCIDENTS 
# 1967 ACCIDENTS 



MAP-4 



STREET AND TRAFFIC CONDITIONS 

The Superintendent of the Street Department supplied 
the following information on those streets where the most 
vehicle accidents occurred in 1966-67 with remedial action 
required or being implemented. 



Depot Street 



Heavy mill traffic; to be widened to 
44 feet. 



Main Street 



Being reworked; completed, December, 
1968, with additional traffic signals 



Downtown Rectangle 



Study of relocation of traffic signals 
suggested. (Joint City-State Highway 
Commission project.) 



Caro 1 ina and 
Oakwood 



Narrow streets, narrow pavement, 
(improvement recommended in 
Thoroughfare Plan). 



N . 3rd and 
Fourth S tree ts 
(Quenby Mall) 

Snuggs Street 



Traffic lights installed January, 1969 



Included in Thoroughfare Plan. (Widen 
Snuggs Street and extend to Boone 
Street . ) 



North First and 
Second S tree ts 



Four lanes narrowing to two lanes. 
Plans include widening to four lanes 
and installing traffic signals. Joint 
City-State Highway Commission project. 



Highways 27 and 
52 



Despite good visibility, traffic 
markings and signs, accidents are 
probably the fault of the motorists; 
i.e., carelessness. 



11 



TABLE 1 



Arrests for Crimes against Property, 

Persons and Juvenile Offenses* 

Total 



Neighborhood 



Juven i le 
Offenses 



Cr ime s 
aga ins t 
Property 



Gr ime s 
aga ins t 
Persons 



per 

100 DU' s 



CITY: 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1. 7 






2 


1 


3 


6 


1.0 






3 


- 


- 


- 


- 






4 


- 


1 


- 


1. 1 






5 


- 


1 


4 


7 .7 






6 


- 


5 


7 


3.9 






7 


- 


19 


11 


5.0 






8 


- 


4 


3 


2. 7 






9 


- 


3 


6 


3.8 






10 


- 


1 


- 


3. 6 






11 


- 


- 


- 


- 






12 


15 


34 


39 


13. 7 






13 


1 


4 


5 


6. 1 






14 


- 


- 


- 


- 




Subtotal 


18 


76 


82 


4.8 




FRINGE 
AREA: 


Al 














A2 


- 


- 


- 


- 






A3 


— 


2 


1 


50. 1 


(only 6 
DU' s) 




A4 


- 


- 


- 


- 






A5 


- 


- 


- 


- 






A6 


- 


1 


- 


1 .9 






A7 


— 


2 


— 


9.5 


(only 21 
DU' s) 




A8 


- 


2 


1 


15.8 


(only 19 
DU' s) 




A9-A9A 


_ 


— 


— 


_ 






A10 


- 


- 


- 


- 






All 


- 


- 


- 


- 






A12 


- 


4 


1 


4.0 






A13 


2 


- 


3 


5.7 






A14 


2 


2 


2 


12.2 


(only 49 
DU ' s) 


Subtota 1 


4 


13 


8 


3.4 





Grand 
Total 



22 



89 



90 



4.6 



"Residence of person convicted 

Source: 1967-68 records of Albemarle Police Department 
and Stanly County Sheriff's Department 



12 



A- 



A-2 



A-3 



TABLE 1 



Arrests for Crimes against Property, 

Persons and Juvenile Offenses* 

Total 



Neighborhood 



Juven ile 
Offenses 



Cr ime s 
aga ins t 
Property 



Cr ime s 
aga ins t 
Persons 



per 

100 DIP s 



CITY 



Subtotal 

FRING1 
AREA: 



Subto 
Grand 
Total 



1 



22 



89 



90 



1.7 



2 


1 


3 


6 


1.0 




3 


- 


- 


- 


- 




4 


- 


1 


- 


1. 1 




5 


- 


1 


4 


7. 7 




6 


- 


5 


7 


3.9 




7 


- 


19 


11 


5.0 




8 


- 


4 


3 


2. 7 




9 


- 


3 


6 


3.8 




10 


- 


1 


- 


3. 6 




11 


- 


- 


- 


- 




12 


15 


34 


39 


13.7 




13 


1 


4 


5 


6. 1 




14 


- 


- 


- 


- 




.1 


18 


76 


82 


4.8 




Al 












A2 


- 


- 


- 


- 




A3 


- 


2 


1 


50. 1 


(only 6 
DIP s) 


A4 


- 


- 


- 


- 




A5 


- 


- 


- 


- 




A6 


- 


1 


- 


1.9 




A7 


— 


2 


— 


9.5 


(only 21 
DIP s) 


A8 


— 


2 


1 


15.8 


(only 19 
DIP s) 


A9-A9A 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 




A10 


- 


- 


- 


- 




All 


- 


- 


- 


- 




A12 


- 


4 


1 


4.0 




A13 


2 


- 


3 


5.7 




A14 


2 


2 


2 


12.2 


(only 49 
DIP s) 


1 


4 


13 


8 


3.4 





4.6 



* Residence of person convicted 

Source: 1967-68 records of Albemarle Police Department 
and Stanly County Sheriff's Department 



12 



CRIMES 

( BY RESIDENCE OF OFFENDER) 




ALBEMARLE 

NORTH CAROLINA 




One dot equals 



indicated 



LEGEND 
CRIMES Br JUVENILES 

• CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS 

# CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 



MAP-5 



Richardson, Davie, 

Cross Streets Parking has been eliminated from Richard- 
son to Cross Streets. 



Pee Dee at Main 



Heaviest travelled intersection in the 
city. Possibility of connecting Pee Dee 
to North rather than to Main Street (as 
proposed in Thoroughfare plan) to elim- 
inate five points. (Snuggs Street in 
this area is now unopened.) 



CRIMES 

One index of blight is the area of residence of per- 
sons committing criminal acts. Table 1 lists by neighbor- 
hood the residence of those persons convicted of juvenile 
offenses, crimes against property and crimes against per- 
sons. Note that Neighborhood 12 has the highest incident 
rate in all three categories. 



EDUCATION 

on the basis of available information, the school sys- 
tem ranks high among schools in North Carolina. Each school 
is fully accredited by the North Carolina Department of 
Public Instruction and the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools, and are staffed by certified personnel. 

The most recent and encouraging announcement made by 
the Albemarle Board of Education, County Board of Education, 
and County Commissioners was recommending a Technical Insti- 
tute for Stanly County. South Albemarle School (to be closed 
at the end of the 1969 school year) will be renovated and 
staffed with funds appropriated by the State, Federal and 
local governments. This facility, hopefully, will be ready 
for operation in July-August, 1969, and should help supple- 
ment the curricula now being offered by area schools -- 



13 



particularly for those enrolled in adult education courses 
in Stanly County (511 persons in 1967). 

The Division of Statistical Services of the North 
Carolina Department of Public Instruction has compiled sig- 
nificant information pertaining to the Albemarle City 
Schools for the 1966-67 school year. Compared to 160 
administrative units in the state, the local schools 
information is as follows: 



Per Pupil Expenditure, Local Funds 

Amount per pupil $87.60 - Rank 15 (of the 169) 
(Range - Low $12.82; High $150.87; Median $46.75) 

Per Pupil Expenditure, All Sources (State, Federal, Local) 
Amount per pupil $403.89 - Rank 21 
(Range - Low $307.22; High $494.33; Median $362.04) 

Taxable Property Valuation per Pupil Enrolled 
Amount per pupil $22,324 - Rank 1 
(Range - Low $3,660; High $22,324; Median $7,828) 

Voted Supplemental Tax Collections per Pupil Enrolled 
Amount per pupil $34.43 - Rank 27 
(Range - Low $0.00; High $99.75; Median $24.54) 

Per Cent of High School Graduates Entering College 
Per cent 48.1 - Rank 35 
(Range - Low 8%; High 71.1%; Median 34.8%) 

Per Cent of High School Graduates Entering Trade , 
Business, or other Formal Training 

Per cent - 20.7 - Rank 23 

(Range - Low 9.0%; High 34.8%; Median 14.5%) 

Pupil-Staff Ratio 

Pupil-Staff Ratio - 1 to 21.9 - Rank 151 

(18 rank lower ) 
(Range - Low 18.2; High 27.4; Median 23.6) 

Number of Library Books per Pupil Enrolled 
Number per pupil - 13.22 - Rank 4 
(Range - Low 4.80; High 23.64; Median 8.28) 



14 



LIBRARY 

The Stanly County Library has recently added another 
service -- for the blind and handicapped. With assistance 
from the North Carolina-South Carolina Regional Library for 
the Blind, it can now make available to the blind and handi- 
capped a talking book service. Any individual whose sight 
or physical condition makes it impossible to hold or read 
conventional printed materials is now eligible for this 
service. This includes the blind and partially blind. Talk- 
ing books are special long-playing phonograph records. Over 
2,900 titles are now available. 

The main problem is the library itself. The present 
building is wholly inadequate; however, plans are being 
formulated to relocate the old Court House and use the 
present site for a new library and off-street parking area. 



HEALTH 

Public health services are carried on in Stanly County 
by one doctor (and volunteer services of local doctors once 
a week), four nurses, two sanitarians, a dog warden, and three 
administrators . 

Because health problems that contribute to -- or occur 
as a result of — blight appear throughout the county and are 
not statistically significant in the neighborhoods delineated 
for this study, total figures for 1967 and five months of 1968 
are listed for the county as follows: 



15 



Illegitimate births 

Births in lower socio- 
economic families 

S t il Ibirths 

Patients in clinics: 
Planned Parenthood 

Prena ta 1 care 

Child health 

Mental health 

Crippled children 

TB patients discharged since 
1966 

TB skin test : 

Head Start children 
First through 9th grades 



1967 
55 

234 



Janua r y-May 
1968 

17 



86 


3 


67 


34 


53 


N/A 


198 



24 

450 (60% positive) 
1 ,596 (3.3% positive) 



The Health Department has close cooperation with 
teachers, the Welfare Department and doctors. Learning 
problems, emotional disturbances, physical disabilities, 
and indigency are brought to their attention. Surveys by 
professional personnel have revealed the causes and recom- 
mended needed remedial action. Monotony of job, lack of 
education, and no motivation for improvement appear quite 
frequently in many cases treated — ragardless of age, sex 
or ra ce . 



WELFARE 

Location of welfare recipients can be considered 
as one concomitant of blight. Such recipients usually 
reside in areas containing low-rental housing which is 
frequently characterized by a general lack of maintenance, 
narrow streets and lots, accumulated debris, and so forth. 
This is generally true in Albemarle. Neighborhoods 7 and 
12 rank highest number of recipients in 1968. (Area A13 
ranks third but it should be noted that the 34 recipients 



16 



A- 



A-2 



A -3 



Illegitimate births 

Births in lower socio- 
economic families 

S t il lb ir ths 

Patients in clinics: 
Planned Parenthood 

Prena ta 1 care 

Child health 

Menta 1 hea 1 th 

Crippled children 

TB patients discharged since 
1966 

TB skin test: 

Head Start children 
First through 9th grades 



1967 
55 

234 



January-May 
1968 

17 



86 


3 


67 


34 


53 


N/A 


198 



24 

4 50 (60% positive) 
1 ,596 (3.3% positive) 



The Health Department has close cooperation with 
teachers, the Welfare Department and doctors. Learning 
problems, emotional disturbances, physical disabilities, 
and indigency are brought to their attention. Surveys by 
professional personnel have revealed the causes and recom- 
mended needed remedial action. Monotony of job, lack of 
education, and no motivation for improvement appear quite 
frequently in many cases treated — ragardless of age, sex 
or race. 



WELFARE 

Location of welfare recipients can be considered 
as one concomitant of blight. Such recipients usually 
reside in areas containing low-rental housing which is 
frequently characterized by a general lack of maintenance, 
narrow streets and lots, accumulated debris, and so forth. 
This is generally true in Albemarle. Neighborhoods 7 and 
12 rank highest number of recipients in 1968. (Area A13 
ranks third but it should be noted that the 34 recipients 



16 













PUBLIC ASSISTANCE CASES 


/ \ * 


-13 


/ A-12 N 








/\ A-14 \ 




—-"/77>v ^^ 








/ A-i y \ 


6 
111 


/ 5 ) >/ 


A-ll 




ALBEMARLE 

NORTH CAROLINA 

0" 3000' 


I A " 2 ^^1 \ ' ** 


ii 2 

4 I 

1 r : 


i \ 


SCALE IN FEET 


\ /— -^ *^v " • 1 




p- < 


,^.A-9a 
A-9 


A-10 


/ Note 
/ One dot equals one case 
unless otherw.se indicated 

LEGEND 
OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

AID TO THE PERMANENTLY AND 
• TOTALLY DISABLED ' 

_ AID TO FAMILIES WITH DEPENDENT 
CHILDREN 


) ^-J~"i 8 *S ■— 
} ( °' / * • 

\ / X / 9 
\ A-3 /a-4 \/ 

\ J^ 5 -/ 


A 3 1 ^*^ 

\ A • • . *■, 

i V . 12 •: •. ,|" 

\ io-\ • • • • . • 

■ 14 fX 


'* 13* . 


\. A-6 




""^""--v. a- a 










i A ~ 7 \ 






• AID TO THE BLIND 

# MEDICAL AID TO THE AGED 

MAP-6 



residing here are all residents of the Stanly Rest Home and 
therefore is not a meanginful representation.) 



TABLE 2 




We 1 fare 


Cases 










Type of 


Ass istance 






Ne ighbo r hoo d 


OAA 


APTD 2 


3 4 
AFDC AB 


MAA 5 


Total 



CITY: 


1 

















2 


5 


1 


1 




4 


11 




3 




1 




1 




2 




4 




1 






1 


2 




5 

















6 


2 


2 




2 


1 


7 




7 


6 


14 


4 


1 


3 


28 




8 


1 


1 




2 




4 




9 


3 


1 






1 


5 




10 




1 


1 






2 




11 

















12 


14 


18 


15 


3 


1 


51 




13 


5 


5 


2 






12 




14 


2 










2 


Subtotal 


38 


45 


23 


9 


11 


126 


FRINGE 
AREA: 


Al 








1 




1 




A2 

















A3 

















A4 






1 






1 




A5 

















A6 

















A7 

















A8 

















A9-A9A 






1 






1 




A10 

















All 

















A12 






1 






1 




A13 


20 


12 




2 


(Rest 


34 
Home ) 




A14 















Subtotal 


20 


12 


3 


3 





38 



Grand 
Total 



57 



26 



12 



11 



164 



Old Age Assistance 

2 
Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled 

3 
Aid to Families with Dependent Children 

4 
Aid to the Blind 

5 
Medical Aid to the Aged 

Source: Stanly County Welfare Department, July, 1968 

17 



POPULATION DATA 

A Population and Economy Study was made for the City 
of Albemarle in 1964. A summary of information compiled for 
that report included present and projected population and 
economic potential. Data pertinent to this report is as 
f o 1 lows : 



1. The city has experienced a population increase for 
each decade over the past 60 years. 

2. Outmigration of the young, productive age groups is 
noticable in the increasing number of non-productive 
persons to be supported by a decreasing productive 
age group . 

3. The ratio of Negroes to the total population is 
increasing. Females outnumber males (probably due 
to outmigration). 

4. Income levels are improving. Income is more evenly 
distributed in Albemarle than in Urban U.S. or 
Urban N.C. 

5. Lack of industrial diversification is still evident 
and implies a lack of stability. 

6. A high proportion of houses valued under $5,000 and 
a lower proportion valued in excess of $15,000. 

7. New residential development is occurring in Stanly 
County at a rather constant rate. 



Population trends by decades are shown in Table 3. 

Total Population - Albemarle and Stanly County 

Assuming a continuation of past trends, Albemarle 
should have a population of 12,556 persons by 1970 and 
12,839 persons by 1980. Also, the future population will 
continue to have a larger proportion of females than males. 
By 1970 females will comprise 53.2% of the population, and 
by 1980 this will increase to 53.3%. 



18 



Population Trends by Decades, Albemarle, 
TABLE 3 Stanly County, North and South Albemarle 

Townships, and North Carolina 

North 
and South 
North Albemarle 
Carol ina Town ships 



Stanly 
Albemarle County 



1900 Population 1,382 



15,220 1,893,810 



4,274 



1910 Population 2,116* 19,909 2,206,287 
Per Cent Change 53 . 1 30. 8 16.5 



6,886* 
61. 1 



1920 Population 2,691 27,429 2,559,123 
Per Cent Change 27.2 37 . 8 30 .0 



12 ,639 
83.5 



1930 Population 3,493 30,216 3,170,276 
Per Cent Change 29.8 10 . 2 23 . 9 



14,727 
• 16.5 



1940 Population 4,060 32,834 3,571,623 
Per Cent Change 16.2 8^ 12. 7 



16,118 
9.4 



1950 Population 11,798** 37,130 4,061,929 
Per Cent Change 190.6 13. 1 13.7 



18,857 
17.0 



1960 Population 
Per Cent Change 



12,261*** 40,87 3 
3.9 10.1 



4,556,155 
12.2 



20,197 

7. 1 



*1910-1920 Total for 1910 includes population (6,886) 
of Albemarle Township, parts taken to form 
North and South Albemarle Townships, and 
parts taken, together with parts of Almond 
and Big Lick Townships, to form Endy Town- 
ship, since 1910. 

**1940-1950 Parts of North Albemarle and South Albemarle 
Townships annexed to Albemarle Town in 1947. 

***1950-1960 Part of South Albemarle Township annexed to 
Albemar le Town . 

Source: Population and Economy, Albemarle, N.C., p3. 



The population of Stanly County should increase to 
43,637 by 1970, and 46,060 by 1980. Like Albemarle, the 
county can also expect to have a larger proportion of fe- 
males than males, 51.5% by 1970, and 51.8% by 1980. 



19 



SUBSTANDARD STRUCTURES 

Non-residential structural blight is primarily of a 
commercial character. This is not evident in four of the 
seven blocks comprising the central business district 
(Neighborhood 3). Other "outlying" areas -- e.g., West 
Main Street, Concord Road, East Main Street, Pee Dee Aven- 
ue, have significant concentrations of commercial blight, 
both in terms of structural condition and mixed land uses. 
(See Map 7). Progress is being made, however, with the 
most recent being the demolition of the old Maralise Hotel 
at West Main and South First Streets (the busiest inter- 
section in the city). Also, relocation of the Court House 
to a site on South Second Street would serve two purposes: 
rid the CBD of the presently inadequate Court House and 
replace the South Second Street structure with a new build- 
ing complex. 

Industrial structural blight is infrequent in Albe- 
marle. The most notable exception to this occurs in 
Neighborhood 7 where several old mills and warehouses are 
in need of major repair. For the most part, industrial 
buildings are in a fairly good structural condition, al- 
though landscaping and minor repairs are often needed. 

For the purposes of this report, permanent dwellings 
(excluding mobile homes) were classified as to structural 
condition. The two classifications are defined as: 



S tandard : Structure that has no, or only slightly visible 
defects which are normally corrected by regular maintenance 
Examples of slight defects are: lack of paint; slight 
damage to porch or steps; slight wear on doorframes, window 
sills or window panes; etc. 



20 



j(S 



A- 



n 



■=*%. 



1 \ 



X 



J 



A-3 



r 



/" 



v 



V 



SUBSTANDARD STRUCTURES 

Non-residential structural blight is primarily of a 
commercial character. This is not evident in four of the 
seven blocks comprising the central business district 
(Neighborhood 3). Other "outlying" areas -- e.g., West 
Main Street, Concord Road, East Main Street, Pee Dee Aven- 
ue, have significant concentrations of commercial blight, 
both in terms of structural condition and mixed land uses. 
(See Map 7). Progress is being made, however, with the 
most recent being the demolition of the old Maralise Hotel 
at West Main and South First Streets (the busiest inter- 
section in the city). Also, relocation of the Court House 
to a site on South Second Street would serve two purposes: 
rid the CBD of the presently inadequate Court House and 
replace the South Second Street structure with a new build- 
ing complex. 

Industrial structural blight is infrequent in Albe- 
marle. The most notable exception to this occurs in 
Neighborhood 7 where several old mills and warehouses are 
in need of major repair. For the most part, industrial 
buildings are in a fairly good structural condition, al- 
though landscaping and minor repairs are often needed. 

For the purposes of this report, permanent dwellings 
(excluding mobile homes) were classified as to structural 
condition. The two classifications are defined as: 



S tandard : Structure that has no, or only slightly visible 
defects which are normally corrected by regular maintenance 
Examples of slight defects are: lack of paint; slight 
damage to porch or steps; slight wear on doorframes, window 
sills or window panes; etc. 



20 




NON-RESIDENTIAL 
BLIGHTED AREAS 



ALBEMARLE 

NORTH CAROLINA 



SCALE IN FEET 




MAP-7 



S ub standard ; A structure that needs more repair than would 
be provided during regular maintenance or one that does not 
provide safe and adequate shelter in its present condition. 
Examples are: holes, open cracks, rotted, loose or missing 
materials in a section of the foundation, walls, or roof; 
rotted or loose window frames or sashes that are no longer 
rainproof or windproof, missing bricks or cracks in the 
chimney which are serious enough to be a fire hazard, etc. 

(Map 8 identifies the areas of substandard housing.) 

The Kingville Area (Neighborhood 12) has the major 
concentration of substandard houses -- of 644 total, 232 
(36%) are substandard. Negro families occupy approximately 
222 of the substandard homes. 



Concentrations of substandard houses are spread 
throughout the city in small pockets. Most noticable are: 



Area 


10 


Area 


12 


Area 


7 


Area 


13 


Area 


1 


Area 


2 



28 
644 
595 
163 
176 
027 



Tota 1 



15 
232 
116 
32 
14 
33 



Subs tanda rd 



(54%) 

(36%) 

(20%) 

(2 0%) 

(8%) 

(3%) 



Residential structures within the city limits: 

3,660 Total 
3,171 Standard (87%) 
495 Substandard (14%) 

Residential structures in the fringe area: 

737 Total 

650 Standard (88%) 
87 Substandard (12%) 

Total planning area: 

4,403 Total 
3,821 Standard (87%) 
582 Substandard (13%) 

The above figures are comparatively low but the 
apparent concentration of low-income housing in substandard 
areas such as Neighborhoods 7, 10, 12 and 13, and the almost 
consistent existence of mixed land uses surrounding them 



21 





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AREAS OF SUBSTANDARD 
& NEGRO HOUSING 



ALBEMARLE 

NORTH CAROLINA 



SCALE IN FEET 




LEGEND 

m NEGRO NEIGHBORHOODS 

I AREAS WITH MOSTLY 5U8STANDA 
HOUSING 



MAP-8 






■■: «1 



further reflect the socio-economic status of the residents 
therein. Rehabilitation of the social and cultural ills 
and redevelopment of the physical properties are obviously 
needed . 



MIXED LAND USES 

Presence of mixed land uses can be both detrimental 
and beneficial. For example, the existence of randomly 
scattered industrial and/or commercial activities in a resi- 
dential area can depreciate land values by being incompatible 
with area development trends, or can provide residents with 
employment and access to nearby shopping facilities. The 
most noticable result of mixed land use is that of noise, 
air pollution and heavy traffic volumes all accompanied by 
decreasing property values. Incompatible mixed land uses 
are not significantly evident in Albemarle planning area 
due, in part, to enforcement of established codes and ordin- 
ances — e.g., zoning, subdivision regulations, etc. 

The intermixture of land uses within the industrial 
area are problems in Albemarle. In some cases industrial 
districts have been poorly located. This is true in Neigh- 
borhood 2 near Montgomery Street and Smith Street, in Neigh- 
borhood 12 in the vicinity of Arey Avenue and Lundix Street; 
and in Neighborhood 7 near Walnut and Monroe Streets. 

There are, however, certain areas along major roads 
in which strip development has occurred. This is extremely 
undesirable because it reduces the major street traffic- 
carrying capacities, increases hazards to traffic safety, 
and decreases adjacent residential property values. Strip 



23 



commercial development is evident from the central business 
district out West Main Street and Concord Avenue to the city 
limits; along US 52 from Chestnut Street north to the city 
limits; along East Main Street from Arey Avenue to Berry Ave 
nue; and south of the central business district along the 
Norwood Highway. 

Many of the older platted streets have resulted in 
poor design, deadends, and inadequate circulation patterns. 
Most of the city's street systems do not have an adequate 
relationship to the school and neighborhood. Major streets 
should not penetrate the neighborhood or pass near elemen- 
tary schools and playgrounds. There is also the need for 
an outer-loop around the city to relieve congestion in the 
central business district. However, recent street improve- 
ments in conjunction with the Thoroughfare Plan are progres- 
sively remedying some of these problems. 



CHARACTERISTICS OF FAMILIES 
LIVING IN SUBSTANDARD HOUSING 

The ten per cent sample survey was conducted to 
determine the characteristics of families affected by sub- 
standard housing in Albemarle and its one-mile perimeter 
area. The interviews were selected on the basis of exterior 
dwelling appearance and are summarized by neighborhood in 
following sections. It must be noted that there are numer- 
ous pockets of substandard housing in the planning area. 
This does not necessarily reflect overall conditions through- 
out any one particular neighborhood. Poor external appear- 
ance may not be indicative of the socio-economic character- 
istics of people residing there. 



24 



Also, the ten per cent sampling in some cases — 
notably the fringe area neighborhoods -- did not produce 
enough interviews to be statistically meaningful. This 
is obvious, for example, in Neighborhood 4 in which only 
two interviews were made. Application of the information 
obtained from these cannot be reasonably assumed to be 
representative of the entire area, although the results 
can be considered representative of those people living in 
blighted housing. 



25 



NEIGHBORHOODS 



h 



NEIGHBORHOOD #1 

Neighborhood #1 is in the northeastern section of 
town; it is bounded on the west by Ridge Street, the corpor- 
ate limits on the north and east, and East Main Street on 
the south. Except for acreage Located along East Main Street 
(zoned for business), portions of the area enclosed by Moss 
Springs Road, Ridge Street and Freeman Avenue, and two por- 
tions along the corporate limits line, the area is zoned 
for s ingle- f ami ly residential purposes. Some of the land 
is used for public and semi-public purposes and approximately 
3 5 7 is undeveloped. The neighborhood is served by the East 
Albemarle Elementary School (constructed in 1932 - 243 student 
capacity). Mixed land uses along East Main Street are run- 
down; housing immediately behind the commercial and public 
uses are 15 or more years old; houses on Snotherly, Cannon, 
Eastside, Carolyn, and Landis Streets are less than five 
years old; and new homes have been built within the last 
year on Wendover and Magnolia Streets. 

Lily Street (.14 miles) is unsurfaced; 14 of the total 
176 (8%) houses are substandard (west of the Fair Grounds on 
Lily Street); the density is 2.7 dwelling units per acre. 
Two fire calls occurred in 1967 and 14 vehicle accidents 
heppened, mostly along East Main Street. 

One juvenile arrest, one crime against property and 
one against persons were reported in the neighborhood. There 
are no public assistance cases in the area. 

Three white families were interviewed -- two lived in 
owner-occupied houses and one rented. One house had three 
rooms and two had four or more rooms. Three houses had hot 



27 



and cold running water inside the unit, flush toilets, 
bathtub or shower, and city water and sewer. The average 
monthly rent, including utilities, was $55, and the esti- 
mated value of owner-occupied structure was $5,250. Four 
males, four females were aged: one (5-14), one (55-64) and 
four over 65 years old. Occupations of head of households 
included retired (1), textiles (1), and disabled (1) and 
clerk (1). Approximate family income for 1967 was $4,500; 
two were collecting Social Security or retirement pay. 
One private automobile and one other means of transportation 
were reported . 



NEIGHBORHOOD #2 

Neighborhood #2 is in the northeastern portion of 
the town; bounded on the west by North First Street (US 52 
North), on the north by the corporate limits, on the 
south by East Main Street, and on the east by Ridge Street. 
This is the largest neighborhood delineated. Predominant 
use of the land is for s ingle- fami ly residential. About 5% 
of the area is zoned for industrial use, and a Neighborhood 
Business Zone is on North Fourth Street between Montgomery 
and Cannon Streets. About 32% of the area is undeveloped. 
Public and semi-public and commercial uses exist along 
Second Street, First Street, and East Main Street. Approxi- 
mately one-fourth of the land along North Second Street and 
a small portion surrounded by East North, Snuggs and East 
Main Streets are zoned commercial. The police station, 
Civil Defense office, Albemarle Senior High School (con- 
structed in 1957 - student capacity 750), Central Elemen- 
tary School (constructed in 1910 - student capacity 594), 
and Albemarle Junior High School (constructed in 1935 - 
student capacity 775), are located in this neighborhood. 



28 



Wiscasset Park and two small neighborhood playgrounds; 
Stanly County Hospital; Health Department; 22 two-family 
and 18 multi-family structures are located in the neigh- 
borhood. Housing in close proximity to the central busi- 
ness district is over 30 years old — most of which has 
been converted to multiple family units. Those houses 
beyond the transitional section have been built within 
the last 5-10 years. Except for the rundown condition of 
some commercial properties, the neighborhood is sound. 
Density per acre is 3.2 dwelling units. 

Auten Avenue, Cardinal Drive, one unnamed street 
and Yadkin Lane (.85 miles) are unsurfaced; 33 of a total 
1,027 (3%) of the houses are substandard. Ten fire calls 
occurred in 1967, and there were 23 points where more than 
two accidents occurred. Two major thoroughfares carry 
heavy traffic volumes through the neighborhood. 

One juvenile arrest, three crimes against property 
and six against persons were reported. There are 11 Wel- 
fare cases. 

Seven white families were interviewed -- five in 
owner-occupied houses and two in renter-occupied houses. 
The seven houses had four or more rooms in each unit; one 
had two sleeping rooms, three had two, and four had two or 
more sleeping rooms. Five houses had hot and cold running 
water inside the unit; two had only cold water inside. 
Seven had flush toilets and six had a bathtub. All were 
on the city water/sewer lines. Monthly rent, including 
utilities, averaged $37.00; estimated value of owner-occu- 
pied structures was $3,775. Six males and ten females 
lived in seven houses; age breakdown was: under 5 (2); 



29 



5-14 (2); 15-24 (1); 25-34 (1); 35-44 (4); 45-54 (2); 
55-64 (1); 65 and over (3). Occupation of head of house- 
hold included: retired (2), textile (2), truck driver (1), 
baby sitter (1), mill worker (3), and carpenter (1). Two 
used a private automobile and three depended on other trans- 
portation to work. Approximate family income for 1967 was 
$3,019; four were collecting Social Security. None were on 
We 1 fa re . 



NEIGHBORHOOD #3 

Neighborhood #3 is in the south-central portion of 
town. It is surrounded by North Street on the north, Third 
Street on the east, South Street on the south, and the 
Carolina and Northwestern Railroad on the west. This is 
the central business district and is zoned commercial and 
developed for business purposes. There area is 87% devel- 
oped. City Hall, Fire Department, Library, Welfare Depart- 
ment and Court House are located in the central business 
district. There are no parks or schools in this neighbor- 
hood. The need for upgrading commercial and public and 
semi-public buildings is apparent. Two two-family and 
five multi-family structures are in this neighborhood. 
Density per acre is 7.8 dwelling units. 

There are no unsurfaced streets in the area; no fire 
calls to residences were reported; and more than two acci- 
dents occurred at five different points. Two of a total 21 
(10%) dwelling units are substandard. Heavy traffic volumes 
associated with the central business district and major 
thoroughfares are an influence on the area. 



30 



No juvenile arrests and no major crimes against 
property or persons were reported. 

One white family living in a rented house with four 
or more rooms in the unit (and two sleeping rooms) was 
interviewed. The dwelling had cold water only inside; had 
a flush toilet and a bathtub and city water and sewer. 
Monthly rent, including utilities, was $40.50. Two males 
and one female (one aged 5-14, two 65 and over) had an 
average income of $2,028 from their occupations as sales 
clerk (1) and retired (1) (collecting Social Security). 
There were no welfare cases in the neighborhood. The fam- 
ily used a private automobile for transportation to work. 



NEIGHBORHOOD #4 

This neighborhood is located almost in the center 
of town; it is bounded on the north by Salisbury Avenue, 
West North Street on the south, North First Street on the 
east and the Carolina and Northwestern Railroad on the west. 
Approximately one-half of the land is zoned for business 
and the other half is zoned for residential use. Other than 
the YMCA, there are no parks or community facilities. A 
small amount (19%) of the land is undeveloped. Dominated by 
mill-owned residences, it fringes on Neighborhood 11 which 
is totally industrial, and is adjacent to the Carolina and 
Northwestern Railroad. Housing in the neighborhood is over 
25 years old; no new construction has taken place recently. 
Four two-family and two multi-family structures are in the 
area. There is no influence on the neighborhood from non- 
residential blight. However, major thoroughfares, downtown 



31 



bound traffic and mill traffic at shift changes compound 
the blighting influences of the neighborhood being associ- 
ated with a textile mill and railroad environment. 

There are no unsurfaced streets in this neighborhood; 
no fire calls to residences were reported; and there were 
four points where more than two accidents occurred. Four 
of a total 93 (4%) dwellings are substandard; density is 
4.2 dwelling units per acre. 

There were no juvenile arrests in the neighborhood, 
and no public assistance cases reported. One major crime 
against property was reported. 

Two white families were interviewed. One dwelling 
had three rooms and one had four or more; one had one 
sleeping unit and one had four or more; two had hot and cold 
running water inside the house, two had a flush toilet and 
two had a bathtub. Two used city water and sewer. Monthly 
rent was $72 (including utilities); the estimated value of 
the owner- occup ied unit was $3,500. Four females aged 5-14 
(1), 45-54 (2) and 65+ (1) were occupied as textile worker 
(1) and music teacher (1). Approximate family income for 
1967 was $3,824; one was collecting Social Security. One 
family used a private car and the other depended on other 
transportation to work. 



32 



NEIGHBORHOOD #5 

The neighborhood is bounded on the north by the 
corporate limits line, on the east by North First Street, 
on the west by the Carolina and Northwestern railroad 
tracks, and on the south by Salisbury Avenue. Almost one- 
half of the land is undeveloped (48%). The remainder is 
used for s ing 1 e- f am i ly residential, commercial and indus- 
trial purposes. The area is zoned for approximately one- 
fourth residential, one-half industrial, and approximately 
one-fifth neighborhood business districts. There are no 
community facilities, but the Albemarle Senior High, Central 
Elementary and Junior High Schools, Wiscasset Park, a park- 
playground and Efird Park are close enough to serve the 
area. The neighborhood is mainly undeveloped (crossed by 
the Winston-Salem Southbound railroad) and has a combina- 
tion of industrial, commercial land uses and mill housing. 
A major thoroughfare (Snuggs Street) crosses the neighbor- 
hood and there are two at-grade railroad crossings. 

There are no unsurfaced streets in the neighborhood; 
no fire calls were reported to residences, and there was 
one point where more than two accidents occurred. Two of a 
total 65 (3%) dwellings are substandard; density per acre is 
3.3 dwelling units. 

There were no juvenile arrests reported; no public 
assistance cases are present. One major crime against prop- 
erty and four against persons are on record. 

One white family and one Negro family were inter- 
viewed. One lived in an owner-occupied unit and the other 
rented. Both houses had four or more rooms (two sleeping 



33 



rooms); one had hot and cold running water inside, the 
other had only cold water inside. Two had a flush toilet; 
one had a bathtub; both used city water and sewer. The 
monthly rent, including utilities, was $50; value of the 
owner-occupied structure was $2,500. Three males and four 
females aged: 5-14 (1), 15-24 (2), 35-44 (2), 65+ (2), were 
employed as textile worker (1) or retired (1). Approximate 
family income for 1967 was $3,200, and one was collecting 
Social Security. One family used a private automobile for 
transportation to work. 



NEIGHBORHOOD #6 

In the shape of a triangle, the neighborhood is 
bounded by the corporate limits on the north, Salisbury 
Avenue on the west, the Winston-Salem Southbound railroad 
tracks on the southeast, and the Carolina and Northwestern 
railroad tracks on the east. More than one-half of the 
land is developed for s ingle- f ami ly residential purposes. 
Other present uses are industrial and pub 1 ic- s emi-pub 1 i c . 
A large portion of the neighborhood is undeveloped. Except 
for one small area zoned for industrial use and an even 
smaller area zoned for commercial use, the neighborhood is 
entirely residential. Overall development utilizes approx- 
imately 65% of the land area. There are no significant 
external influences of non-residential blight in the area. 
Lower income families live in the textile mill housing. 
Wiscasset Mill owns these houses and maintains them very 
well (mostly 30-40 years old). More recent construction 
(10 years or less) of housing in the area bounded by Riley, 
Snuggs and Hilltop Streets has been taking place. There is 
one two-family dwelling in this neighborhood. Wiscasset 
Ball Park is also in the area. 



34 






Three fire calls and one point where more than two 
accidents occurred were reported. Parker Street, Moose 
Street and an unnamed street (.71 miles) are unsurfaced. 
Seven of a total 304 (2%) dwelling units are substandard; 
density per acre is 3.2 dwelling units. A major thorough- 
fare (Snuggs Street) crosses the neighborhood, and Ash 
Street (a collector) bisects Snuggs Street. Neighborhood 
6 has the lowest percentage of substandard houses. 






No juvenile arrests were reported but there were 
five major crimes against property and seven against per- 
sons. There are seven Welfare cases in the area. 

Five white families were interviewed. Four lived 
in owner-occupied structures and one rented. One dwelling 
had three rooms, one had four or more; one had one sleeping 
room; two had two sleeping rooms. Five dwelling units had 
hot and cold running water inside the house with a flush 
toilet and bathtub and access to city water and sewer. The 
monthly rent, including utilities, was $43; estimated value 
of owner-occupied structures was $2,937.50. Seven males and 
eight females aged: under 5 (2), 5-14 (1), 15-24 (2), 25-34 
(2), 35-44 (1), 45-54 (2), 55-64 (1), 65+ (4) were occupied 
as meat cutter (1), textiles (2), retired (4), knitters (2). 
Approximate family income for 1967 was $4,028; five were 
collecting Social Security. Five travelled to work by 
pr ivat e auto . 



35 



NEIGHBORHOOD #7 

This neighborhood is Located west of the railroad on 
the northwest. It is bounded on the west by the corporate 
limits, on the south by the Concord Road and West Main Street, 
on the east by the Winston-Salem Southbound railroad tracks, 
and on the north by Salisbury Avenue. The land is used pri- 
marily for residential purposes. Eleven two-family and one 
multi-family structures, public and semi-public (including 
10th Division Headquarters of the North Carolina State Highway 
Commission), industrial and commercial uses are located in the 
area with the appropriate zoning. North Albemarle Elementary 
School (constructed in 1949 - student capacity 432), a park- 
playground and Efird Park serve the area. Some of what was 
formerly mill housing is now owner-occupied and is encircled 
by Greenwood, Columbus, Elm and Pennington Streets. Structures 
average about 30-40 years old and are mostly substandard and 
poorly maintained. Housing owned by Wiscasset Mill, south of 
Greenwood to the neighborhood boundary lines, is much better 
maintained than most of the privately owned properties although 
most of the houses are 30-40 years old. About 60% of the land 
is devoted to single-family residential, 15% to commercial, 
public and semi-public and industrial, and 25% is undeveloped. 
Non-residential blight is evidenced by run-down commercial 
uses along Concord Road ( NC 73) and West Main Street. Within 
the neighborhood there are several commercial and industrial 
uses that need repair and upgrading to reduce their effect on 
residential areas. 

Fifteen fire calls were reported; eight points had 
more than two accidents. Three unnamed streets, Monroe Street 
and Hill and Long Streets (1.05 miles) are unsurfaced. Almost 
20% (116 of a total 595) of the dwellings are substandard; 



36 



density per acre is 3.0 dwelling units. A major thoroughfare 
(Carolina Avenue) cuts through the neighborhood. 

Nineteen major crimes against property and 11 against 
persons were reported. There are 28 Welfare cases. 

Twenty-eight white families were interviewed. Nine 
lived in owner-occupied structures and 19 rented. Four of 
the structures had three rooms, 25 had four or more; one had 
four sleeping rooms, 15 had two, 8 had three, and one had 
four or more. Hot and cold running water were in 20 units, 
eight had only cold water inside, and one had no running water. 
Flush toilets were in 27 units, one had none; 24 had a bathtub 
and four had none? all but one were connected to city water and 
sewer. Monthly rent averaged $42.89; estimated value of owner- 
occupied structures was $3,717.77. 

Forth-three males and 45 females aged under 5 (12), 
5-14 (14), 15-24 (18), 25-34 (6), 35-44 (10), 45-54 (18), 
55-64 (9), 65+ (16), occupied the 28 houses visited. Occupa- 
tions included: textile (6), retired (4), disabled (4), pro- 
jectionist (1), highway department (2), furniture (3), carpen- 
ter (1), domestic (1), gardner (1), taxi driver (1), laborer 
(1), plumber (1), cashier (1), laundry (1). Approximate family 
income for 1967 was $3,566; 19 were collecting Social Security 
and three were collecting Welfare. Nine drove to work, in a 
private automobile and 22 depended on other transportation. 



37 



NEIGHBORHOOD #8 

This neighborhood is bounded on the northeast by Concord 
Road, the southwest by the corporate Limits line, and the south- 
east by West Main Avenue. Except for highway businesses along 
Concord Road, some neighborhood businesses, and two industrial 
uses, single-family residences dominate the neighborhood. There 
are two multi-family structures, industrial, public and semi- 
public and commercial land uses but no schools or parks. West 
Albemarle Fire Station, the N.C. Highway Patrol Station and the 
City Quarry are located in the area. Houses north of and south- 
east of West Main Street are between 20 and 30 years. No non- 
residential structures influence blighting characteristics on 
the neighborhood, but the older section (Oakwood Park) is be- 
ginning to show signs of deterioration. There is a new sub- 
division with houses under construction. The City Quarry 
(western section of the neighborhood) is far enough removed 
from the residential development to avoid having a blighting 
affect. 

Two fire calls to residences were reported; there were 
no points at which more than two accidents occurred. Twenty 
of a total 260 (8%) dwellings were substandard; density per 
acre was 3.4 dwelling units. A major thoroughfare (West Main 
Street Extension) bisects the neighborhood. Fourth Avenue 
(.09) miles is unsurfaced. 

Four major crimes against property and three against 
persons but no juvenile arrests were reported. Four families 
were receiving public assistance. 

Eight white families were interviewed; three lived in 
owner-occupied dwellings and five rented. Eight structures 
had four or more rooms; six had two sleeping rooms and two had 
three sleeping rooms; six had hot and cold running water 



38 



inside; two had only cold water; six had a flush toilet and 
bathtub, two did not. All were served with city water and 
sewer. Monthly rent, including utilities, was $41.10; esti- 
mated value of owner- occup ied structures, $4,866. 

Sixteen males and 14 females were aged: under 5 (3), 
5-14 (3), 15-24 (8), 25-34 (3), 35-44 (3), 45-54 (3), 55-64 
(6), 65+ (1). They were employed as: textile workers (5), 
disabled (2), painter (1), manufacturing (1), sales clerk 
(1), textile mill (4). Six travelled to work in a private 
automobile, two depended on other transportation. Approxi- 
mate family income for 1967 was $3,841.71; three were col- 
lecting Social Security. 



NEIGHBORHOOD #9 

Neighborhood #9 is located in the southwest portion 
of town. It is bounded on the north by West Main Street, on 
the northwest by West Main Avenue, on the south by the corpor- 
ate limits and on the east by the Winston-Salem Southbound 
railroad tracks. Zoning is divided almost equally between 
residential and industrial. There is a small strip of busi- 
ness activity to the north. Land is used primarily for single- 
family and two-family residences, public and semi-public, and 
commercial purposes. More than half (56%) of the land is un- 
developed. West Albemarle Elementary School (constructed in 
1935 - student capacity 297) and the Baptist Home are located 
in the area. A transitional area, with homes 10-30 years old 
(and run-down) exists along Harwood, Old Charlotte, West Main 
and the railroad tracks; better maintained houses (10-30 years 
old) are located along West Main, Old Charlotte, and Coble 
Streets; a new area has developed on Fernwood Drive, Hazelwood 



39 



Drive and Cameron Drive within the Last five years (facing NC 
27 Bypa s s ) . 

Three fire calls to residences and two points where 
more than two accidents occurred were reported. Sixteen of 
a total 237 (7%) dwelling units are substandard; density per 
acre is 2.9 dwelling units. Coy Street (.09 miles) is unsur- 
faced. Coble and Old Charlotte Road (collector streets) 
carry traffic volumes through the area where older homes are 
located. 

There were three major crimes against property and 
six against persons, but no juvenile arrests. Five families 
are collecting Welfare. 

Four white families were interviewed. Three families 
owned their homes and one rented. All of the houses had hot 
and cold running water inside with flush toilets and bathtubs 
and were served with city water and sewer. Monthly rent, 
including utilities, was $57.00; estimated value of owner- 
occupied structures was $2,300. 

Three males and four females were aged:15-24 (1), 
55-64 (4), 65+ (2). Occupations were: hospital (1), retired 
(3), textiles (2). One used a private automobile and the 
other a bus for transportation to work. Approximate family 
income for 1967 was $2,250; five were collecting Social 
Security or retirement pay. 



40 



NEIGHBORHOOD #10 

Located in the southern portion of town, it is bounded 
on the north by West Main Street, the Winston-Salem Southbound 
railroad tracks on the west, South First Street on the east, 
and NC 27 Bypass on the south. The neighborhood is almost 
totally zoned for industrial uses; however, commercial, public 
and semi-public and s ing 1 e- f ami 1 y residences are present. 
About 14% of the land is undeveloped. The area is bisected 
by the Carolina and Northwestern railroad tracks, is mainly 
an industrial and warehousing area (lumber yard and finishing 
plant, feed mill), and has some strip commercial development. 
The area is subject to heavy dust and odors. The City Ware- 
house and the industrial and commercial development along the 
railroad tracks should be upgraded to reduce the affects of 
blight on the neighborhood. 

One fire call to a residence was reported. Two points 
were the scene of more than two accidents. Fifteen of a total 
28 (54%) dwelling units are substandard; density is 2.1 dwell- 
ing units per acre. This neighborhood is bisected by the 
Northwestern Railroad and is crossed by a major thoroughfare 
(Aquadale Road) on the south. 

One major crime against property occurred in 1967. 
Two families receive public assistance. 

The three white families interviewed live in rented 
houses. The structures had four or more rooms, two sleeping 
rooms in each. All had hot and cold running water inside the 
housing unit with a flush toilet and bathtub and were served 
by city water and sewer. Monthly rent, including utilities , 
a vera ged $43.00. 



41 



Four males and five females were aged: under 5 (1), 
5-14 (2), 15-24 (1), 35-44 (1), 45-54 (1), 55-64 (2), 65+ 
(1). Occupations included: laundry (1), retired (1), textile 
(1), service station (1). Approximate family income for 1967 
was $1,670; two families were collecting Social Security or 
retirement pay. Two families depended on bus or other means 
of transportation. 



NEIGHBORHOOD #11 

Centrally located with the Winston-Salem Southbound 
railroad tracks on the west, Carolina and Northwestern rail- 
road on the east and West Main Street on the south, the area 
is used and zoned for industrial purposes (textile mills). 
A small business area is in the southern portion and a small 
portion (67 ) is undeveloped. There are no schools, parks or 
houses in the neighborhood. No interviews were conducted. 



NEIGHBORHOOD #12 

Neighborhood #12 is known as "Kingville" or South 
Albemarle. It is bounded on the north by East Main Street, 
on the south by NC 27 Bypass, on the east by Coggins Avenue, 
and on the west by South First Street. Predominant zoning of 
the area is residential, but there are also areas of indus- 
trial, neighborhood commercial and highway commercial zoning. 
Approximately one-half of the land is zoned for residential; 
a large portion (40 %) is undeveloped. Commercial, public and 
semi-public, multi-family and industrial uses are present. 



42 



Community facilities are the Kingville Branch Library and 
the South Albemarle Elementary School. South Albemarle 
Elementary School was originally constructed in 1936 and was 
formerly known as Kingville School (student capacity of 567). 
This school is to be closed in June, 1969, by the Albemarle 
Board of Education and will be reopened as a supplementary 
and adult education facility. 

Most of the housing in the area is 25-50 years old, 
but a new development encircled by Colston, Spalding, Waddel, 
and Lundix Streets has houses from 1-10 years old. Low to 
middle income families (predominantly Negro) occupy the 
housing. There are 39 two-family dwellings and 10 multi- 
f amil y units. 

Fifteen fire calls to residences were reported, and 
eight points where more than two accidents occured are on 
record. Unsurfaced streets (1.59 miles) are Adelaide, Arm- 
field, Grant, Hillside, Lande , four unnamed streets, Dunlap 
and Beale, Waddel Drive, Summit Avenue, Thomas and Center 
Streets. Commercial and industrial uses are mingled with 
residential uses. Two major thoroughfares, South Second 
Street and Arey Avenue, pass through the neighborhood as well 
as the collector streets Gibson, Lennox, South Cotton Avenue, 
Wall Street and Summit Avenue. Blight appears in the commer- 
cial uses along East Main Street and in neighborhood commer- 
cial outlets. Substandard houses numbered 232 of a total 644 
(36%); density per acre is 4.4 dwelling units. 






Fifteen juvenile arrests were made; 34 major crimes 
against property and 39 against persons were reported. Fifty- 
one cases of public assistance are: 16 Aid to Families with 
Dependent Children, 14 Old Age Assistance, 18 Aid to Perma- 
nently and Totally Disabled, and 3 Aid to the Blind. 



43 



Thirty-four Negro families were interviewed. Twelve 
houses were owner-occupied, 21 were rented. Thirty of the 
houses had four or more rooms; two had three, one had two and 
one had one. Twenty-three houses had two sleeping rooms, nine 
had three and two had one. Nineteen had hot and cold running 
water inside the housing unit, fifteen had only cold water 
inside. Thirty-four had flush toilets, 25 had a bathtub and 
nine had neither. Thirty houses were supplied with city 
water and all had city sewer. Monthly rent, including util- 
ities, averaged $38.30; estimated value of owner-occupied 
structures was $7,100 (average). 

Sixty-one males and 72 females were aged: under 5 
(21), 5-14 (35), 15-24 (21), 25-34 (15), 35-44 (19), 45-54 
(23), 55-64 (7), 65+ (2). Thirty-eight children were enrolled 
in school. Occupations of head of household were: pastor (1), 
textiles (7), poultry (1), retired (3), disabled (2), service 
station (1), teacher (1), laborer (1), machine operator (1), 
truck driver (1), hospital (1), cafeteria (1), bricklayer 
(1). Twenty-seven had private automobiles, six depended on 
other means of transportation. The approximate family income 
for 1967 was $4,158; nine were collecting Social Security or 
retirement pay; three were collecting Welfare. 



NEIGHBORHOOD #13 

Neighborhood #13 is bounded on the north by East Main 
Street, the west by Coggins Avenue and the east by the corpor- 
ate limits. Zoning is primarily for residential use. There 
is, however, a small strip zoned for business along East Main 
Street. Commercial, industrial, public and semi-public, and 



44 



multi-family residences are present in the area. About 60% 
of the land is developed. The houses average 15 years or 
more in age -- and are "extensions" of "Kingville" and the 
low to below average income families. 

No fire calls were reported. There were three points 
where more than two accidents occurred. Unsurfaced streets 
(.6 miles) are Crowell Avenue, Hinson Street, Groves Avenue, 
Lincolnton and Stanly Streets. Thirty-two of a total 163 
(20%) of the houses are substandard; density per acre is 
3.8 dwelling units. Three collector streets, Bell and Amhurst 
cross the neighborhood. 

One juvenile arrest, four major crimes against proper- 
ty and five against persons were reported. Twelve families 
receive Welfare payments. 

Seven Negro families were interviewed. Six structures 
have four or more rooms, one had three; two have three sleep- 
ing rooms, four have two and one had one. One has hot and 
cold running water inside the unit, five have only cold water, 
and one has running water on the property but not inside the 
unit. One had a flush toilet and bathtub; the other six had 
neither. All seven were served with city water and sewer. 
Average monthly rent, including utilities, was $33.00. 

Twenty-two males and 25 females were aged: under 5 (14), 
5-14 (14), 15-24 (11), 25-34 (3), 35-44 (3), 45-54 (2). Seven- 
teen children were enrolled in school. Occupations included: 
machine operator (1), textiles (3), City (1), steel (1), 
Country Club (1), Baptist Home (1), domestic (1). Six had 
private automobiles and three depended on other means of trans- 
portation. The approximate family income for 1967 was $4,100. 
One family was collecting Social Security or retirement pay. 

No major crimes or juvenile arrests were reported. 



45 



NEIGHBORHOOD #14 



This neighborhood is bounded on the north by NC 27 
Bypass, the southwest and southeast by the corporate limits. 
Zoning is primarily for residential purposes. Other zoning 
is located in the southwest portion for neighborhood commer- 
cial and industrial purposes. Land usage is primarily unde- 
veloped (71 %) , although there are uses for public and semi- 
public, s ingle- f ami ly residential, and one area of commercial 
development. The area, although sparsely developed, is mostly 
residential. Homes are ten years or older and are occupied 
by low to middle income families. A new residential area -- 
Ross Hills with 12-15 s ing le- f ami ly units -- is developing. 

No fire calls to residences were on record. There 
was one point where more than two accidents occurred. Canter- 
berry Road, and Hastings Drive (.45 miles) are unsurfaced. 
Two of the 53 houses (4%) are substandard; 3.3 dwelling units 
density per acre. One major thoroughfare (US 52) crosses the 
neighborhood. A small portion of NC 27 Bypass is in the area. 
No residential interviews were made. There were two cases of 
Welfare assistance. 



46 



FRINGE AREA OF ALBEMARLE (Extends 
one-mile from the corporate limits 
in all directions) 



(Note: City sewer is not currently available to residential 
units located outside the corporate limits. This is 
a policy of the City Board of Commissioners. City 
water is available in certain areas (mainly on the 
north side of the city limits), but present policy 
does not permit extension of lines to serve addi- 
tional dwellings. Existing lines extending beyond 
the corporate limits are for the most part main 
transmission lines or industrial supply lines.) 



NEIGHBORHOOD Al 

The neighborhood is located outside the corporate 
limits to the west. It is bounded on the north by Pennington 
Road, the west by the one-mile limit, and the south by the 
Concord Road, and. east by the corporate limits line. Zoning 
is predominantly residential. Most (877o) of the land is un- 
developed; industrial and commercial uses front on Concord 
Road. Most of what were formerly mill-owned houses (40 years 
old) are now owner-occupied and are run-down. New develop- 
ments have occurred in the northern section of the area. This 
is a combination " low- income-a vera ge- income " neighborhood. 
There are no school or park facilities here. Density is 2.1 
dwelling units per acre. 

Sixteen of a total 9 9 (16%) dwelling units are sub- 
standard. There was one family receiving public assistance, 
Aid to the Blind. 

Four white families were interviewed. Three lived in 
owner-occupied structures, one rented. The four houses had 



47 



four or more rooms; two had two bedrooms, two had three. One 
had hot and cold running water inside the house, two had only 
cold water inside, and one had no running water. One unit had 
a flush toilet and bathtub, the other three had neither. One 
structure had city water, two used an individual well, and two 
had outside privy. Monthly rent, including utilities, averaged 
$33.50; owner-occupied structures averaged $2,700 in value. 
Eight males and six females were aged: under 5 (2), 5-14 (2), 
15-24 (5), 25-34 (1), 45-54 (1), 55-64 (2), 65+ (1). Three 
children were enrolled in school. 

Occupations were: textiles (2), sheet metal business- 
man (1), plumber (1), husbands helper (1). Three had private 
cars for transportation, one used a taxi. Approximate family 
income in 1967 was $5,196.50. One person was collecting Social 
Security. 



NEIGHBORHOOD A2 

West of Albemarle, the neighborhood is bounded on the 
north by the Concord Road, the south by SR 1267, the west by 
the one-mile limit and the east by the corporate limits. The 
area is zoned residential — but most of the neighborhood has 
not yet developed for urban use. There is a section of indus- 
trial use in the northern portion and a small public and semi- 
public use. There are no school or park facilities. The 
water treatment plant and City Lake are located just beyond 
the corporate limits. The influence of two mills, treatment 
plant, City Lake and Quarry, and substandard housing do nothing 
to enhance this area. Density is 1.9 dwelling units per acre. 
Four of 16 (25 7») houses are substandard. 



48 



Two interviews were conducted with white families. One 
owned his house, the other rented. Both had four or more rooms 
and both had three sleeping rooms. Hot and cold running water 
were inside one unit, the other had no running water. One had a 
flush toilet and bathtub, the other had neither and depended on 
an outside privy. Monthly rent was $20; estimated value of 
owner-occupied structure was $7,000. 

Four males and five females were aged: under 5 (1), 
5-14 (1), 15-24 (3), 25-34 (1), 45-54 (1), 55-64 (2). Three 
children were in school. Occupations were: construction worker 
(1), textiles (1), construction helper (1). Two had private 
automobiles. Approximate family income for 1967 was $5,500. 
One person was collecting Social Security. 



NEIGHBORHOOD A3 

Neighborhood A3 is located southwest of town. It is 
bounded on the north by SR 1267, the west by the one-mile 
limit, and the east by SR 1268. The area is zoned for resi- 
dential use and most of the development has been for this pur- 
pose except for a small area of commercial outlets in the 
southern portion. The majority of the land is undeveloped and 
is wooded farm land with one private road. There are no school 
or park facilities in the area. Density is 1.3 dwelling units 
per acre. One of six (16%) is substandard. 

Two crimes were committed against property, and two 
aga ins t per s ons . 



49 



NEIGHBORHOOD A4 

The area is bounded on the west by Poplin Grove 
Church Road, on the north by West Main Street Extension, 
on the east by the corporate limits and Long Creek, and by 
West Main Avenue (Charlotte Road) on the southeast. Zoned 
for residential use, there are some industrial, commercial 
and public and semi-public uses present; however, much of 
the land is undeveloped. There are no school or park facil- 
ities located here. Farm-type houses, bottom land and woods 
typify the area on the north. Low to middle income families 
occupy the housing units. Density per acre is 2.4 dwelling 
units . 

Some retail and industrial uses along West NC 27 
are poorly maintained and add blight to the neighborhood. 
Six of 43 (14%) houses are substandard. One family receives 
Aid to Families with Dependent Children. 

Four interviews were conducted with white families. 
Three lived in owner-occupied structures, one rented. Four 
had four or more rooms, one had one sleeping room, three had 
two. One structure had hot and cold running water inside the 
unit, three had only cold water inside. Three had flush 
toilet, one did not. Two had bathtub or shower, two did not. 
Four depended on wells; one used an outside privy. Monthly 
rent, including utilities, was $36; average value of owner- 
occupied structures was $2,833. 



Six males and seven females were aged: under 5 (2), 
15-24 (2), 35-44 (2), 45-54 (1), 55-64 (1), 65+ (1). No 
children were in school. Occupations included: retired (1), 
plumber (1), disabled (1), practical nurse (1), farm labor 
(1), mechanic (1), textiles (1). One family had a private car. 
Approximate family income for 1967 was $3,291; five collecting 
Social Security or retirement pay. 

50 



NEIGHBORHOOD A5 

Neighborhood A5 is bounded on the northwest by Char- 
lotte Road (leading to West Main Avenue), the one-mile fringe 
limit line on the southwest, N.C. 27 Bypass on the southeast, 
and the city limit line on the northwest. The area is mostly 
zoned for residential purposes but there are some commercial 
and industrial areas. Approximately one-half of the land is 
undeveloped. Low middle income residences, city maintenance 
shops and commercial outlets characterize the neighborhood. 
No schools or parks are in the area. A major thoroughfare 
has been proposed for Neighborhood A5. None of the 39 dwell- 
ings is substandard. Density per acre is 2.2 dwelling units. 

One white family was interviewed. They lived in an 
owner-occupied structure with four or more rooms and two bed- 
rooms. Only cold water was inside the unit; there was no 
flush toilet and no bathtub and they depended on a well. The 
estimated value of the structure was $2,000. 

Three males and two females were aged: 5-14 (3), 25-34 
(1), 35-44 (1). Three children were in school. As a farm 
laborer the approximate family income for 1967 was $4,200. The 
f ami ly had a car . 



NEIGHBORHOOD A6 

Located in the south portion of the fringe area, it is 
bounded by NC 27 Bypass on the north and west, the one-mile 
limit line on the south, and Aquadale Road on the east. The 
land is zoned for residential and light industrial purposes, 
but there are public and semi-public, industrial and commercial 



51 



purposes present. For the most part, the area is undeveloped. 
The sewage treatment plant is located on Little Long Creek, 
and a State prison camp and prison shop are important features 
of the area. The neighborhood is characterized by one section 
of above average homes in Wesley Heights, lower priced homes 
in the eastern portion of the area and average homes in the 
western section. There are no schools or parks within the 
neighborhood. Density is 2.1 dwelling units per acre. 

Three of 5 2 (6%) houses are substandard. One major 
crime against property was reported. 

Two Negro families were interviewed. One owned the 
house, the other rented, both had four or more rooms, one with 

two sleeping rooms and one with three sleeping rooms; neither 
had running water, flush toilet or bathtub. One family had a 
well, one had a privy and "takes water from the store." Esti- 
mated value of owner-occupied structure was $1,500; rent for 
the other was unknown. 

Eight males and six females were aged: under 5 (3), 
5-14 (6), 15-24 (1), 25-34 (1), 45-54 (4). Five children were 
in school. Occupations included: textile (1), domestic (2), 
laundry worker (2), disabled (1). One family used a private 
automobile for transportation. Approximate family income for 
1967 was $1,603; one was collecting Social Security or retire- 
ment pa y » 



52 



NEIGHBORHOOD A7 

Neighborhood A7 is Located in the southcentral portion 
of the fringe area. It is bounded on the northeast by US 52, 
the city Limits on the north, Aquadaie Road on the west and 
the one-mile fringe limit Line on the south. There are pubiic 
and semi-pubiic, s ing i e- f am i L y residences, and commercial uses 
in the area — which is generally undeveloped. A7 shares Rock 
Creek Park with Neighborhood 14 - but there are no schools. Low 
m iddl e- income type housing is in the western portion and some 
of the same type is located along the boundary streets. There 
are several small retail businesses that are rundown, and ex- 
cept for one abandoned railroad (Northwestern) and the Winston- 
Salem Southbound, the remainder of the area is vacant farmland 
and wooded. Seven of the 21 (33%) houses are substandard. 
Density per acre is 1.0 dwelling units. Two crimes against 
property were reported. 

The three white families interviewed lived in owner- 
occupied structures. All had four or more rooms, one had one 
bedroom, and two had three; all had hot and cold running water 
inside the unit, with flush toilets and bathtub. One used 
city water, the other two had individual wells. Estimated 
value of the structures was $3,000. 

Four males and two females were aged: 15-24 (2), 35-44 
(1), 45-54 (3). Occupations were: cafe worker (1), textiles 
(1), dye plant (1). Two families had private automobiles. 
Approximate family income for 1967 was $2,195; two were collect- 
ing war pensions. 



53 



NEIGHBORHOOD A8 

This area is located southeast of the town of Albemarle. 
It is bounded on the north by the corporate limits, the west by 
US 52 South, the south by the planning area boundary, and the 
east by Country Road. The neighborhood is zoned for residential 
purposes, but there are public and semi-public uses present. 
The Albemarle Airport and a small amount of neighborhood commer- 
cial businesses are in this neighborhood. Houses facing Norwood 
Road are of the average type. Density per acre is 1.9 dwelling 
units. Two of nineteen houses (11%) are substandard. Two crimes 
against property and one against persons were reported. 

No interviews were made in this neighborhood. 



NEIGHBORHOOD A9 

A9 is located in the southeastern portion of the plan- 
ning area. It is bounded by NC 27 Bypass on the northwest, 
Country Road on the west, the one-mile fringe limit line on the 
east, and the Raleigh Highway (NC 27 and 73) on the north. The 
land is used for s ing le- f am i 1 y residential, commercial and 
industrial, and public and semi-public uses. The area, mostly 
undeveloped, is zoned for residential purposes. There are no 
schools or parks. Midd 1 e- income type housing, two salvage 
yards, several retail businesses, and the VFW clubhouse charac- 
terize the area. Three of 57 (6%) houses are substandard. One 
family receives public assistance. Density is 1.7 dwelling 
unit s per acre . 

Two white families, living in their own homes, were 
interviewed. One structure had three rooms and two bedrooms; 



54 



one had four or more rooms and two bedrooms. Neither had run- 
ning water, flush toilet or bathtub and depended on neighbors' 
wells and an outside privy. Estimated value of owner-occupied 
structures was $900. 

Three males and two females were aged: 5-14 (1), 55-64 
(3), 65+ (1). One child attended school. Occupations included: 
junk hauler (1), mows yards (1), babysitter (1). One family 
had a private automobile for transportation. Approximate family 
income for 1967 was $742 and two families were collecting Welfare 



NEIGHBORHOOD A9A 






This neighborhood is located in the eastern portion of 
the planning area and is bounded on the northwest by the corpor- 
ate limits and on the southeast by NC 27 Bypass. This is the 
smallest area of the study. It is zoned for residential use 
and is undeveloped. There are no community facilities (e.g., 
schools, parks, etc.). Density per acre is 2.2 dwelling units. 
One of the two houses is substandard (50%). No interviews were 
conducted . 



NEIGHBORHOOD A10 

Located in the east central portion of the planning 
area this neighborhood is bounded on the north and west by NC 
740, on the south by the Raleigh Highway (NC 27 and 73), and 
on the north and east by the one-mile fringe limit line. Most 
of the land is undeveloped; however, there are commercial and 
public and semi-public uses. The area is characterized by 
average type houses on Anderson Grove Church Road, retail out- 



55 



lets and a transfer company, and vacant farmland. There are no 
schools or parks in the neighborhood. Density is 2.1 dwelling 
units per acre. Eight of the 36 (22%) houses are substandard. 

Two white families were interviewed. One was an owner- 
occupied structure and the other was rented; both had four or 
more rooms; one had two sleeping rooms and the other had one. 
One structure had only cold water inside; the other used water 
drawn from a well through a hose to the house. Neither house 
had a flush toilet or bathtub and both used outside privies. 
The monthly rent, including utilities, averaged $33.33. The 
estimated value of the owner-occupied structure was $1,000. 

Two males and two females were aged: 15-24 (1), 45-54 
(1), 55-64 (1), 65+ (1). Occupations included: farmer and Oil 
Company employee (1), retired (1), disabled (1). One family 
had a car. Approximate family income for 1967 was $2,056, and 
two were collecting Social Security or retirement pay. 



NEIGHBORHOOD All 

The neighborhood is bounded on the north and west by 
Ridge Road, the southwest by the corporate limits, NC 740 on 
the southeast, and the one-mile fringe limit line on the north- 
east. Land is used for s ing le- f am i ly residential, public and 
semi-public, industrial, and commercial purposes. The area is 
zoned for residential purposes, and typical of the fringe area, 
it is mostly undeveloped. A municipal pa rk-p la yf ie 1 d to be 
developed in conjunction with a Junior High School on Ridge 
Road has been proposed for the area -- but no community facil- 
ities are presently located here. Average type housing is loca- 
ted on Eastwood Park, the Fairgrounds and the Army Reserve 
Building characterize the area. Density is 1.7 dwelling units 



56 



per acre. Seven of a total 9 6 houses (7%) are substandard. No 
interviews were conducted in this area. 



NEIGHBORHOOD AL2 

This neighborhood is located north of the corporate 
limits, is bounded on the north by the one-mile fringe limit 
line, the south by the corporate limits, the west by US 52 
North, and the east by Ridge Road. The area is undeveloped -- 
except for some small commercial (along US 52), industrial and 
semi-public purposes. The area is zoned residential and con- 
tains above average homes in the northeastern section; average 
homes are located on Pennington Ferry Road. Substandard houses 
are located west of the railroad tracks that bisect the neigh- 
borhood. No schools or parks are located here. Density per 
acre is 2.3 dwelling units. Eleven of 124 (9%) of the houses 
are substandard. One family receives Welfare Assistance. Four 
crimes against property and one against persons were reported. 

Two interviews were conducted. Both were white famil- 
ies and lived in their own homes with four or more rooms -- one 
with two sleeping rooms, the other with three sleeping rooms 
and both with hot and cold running water inside with flush 
toilets and bathtubs. Both houses used wells. Estimated value 
of the houses was $1,425. 

One male and two females were over 65 years of age and 
retired. They had an automobile and averaged $1,470 income 
for 1967. Three persons were collecting Social Security or 
ret ir ement pay . 



57 



NEIGHBORHOOD A13 

Bounded on the north by the one-mile fringe Line, the 
south by the corporate line, and the west by Salisbury Avenue, 
and the east by US 52 North, this area is located north of the 
corporate limits. Most of the land is undeveloped. Single- 
family residential, commercial and industrial uses are present. 
Houses are more than 20 years old and are substandard. Below 
average to average housing is located on US 52; the streets are 
poorly platted and maintained. A trailer is now being in- 
stalled. There are no community facilities. Density per 
acre is 2.4 dwelling units. 

Twelve of 88 (14%) houses are substandard. Two crimes 
by juveniles and three crimes against persons were reported. 
No interviews were conducted in this neighborhood. 



NEIGHBORHOOD A14 

Area A14 is located in the northwestern portion of the 
planning area and is bounded on the north and west by the one- 
mile fringe limit, the south by SR 1401, the southeast by the 
corporate limits, and the northeast by Salisbury Avenue. The 
area is zoned for residential purposes, is used for single- 
family residences, and is mostly undeveloped. There are no 
community facilities (e.g., schools, parks, etc.). New housing 
on Mann Road, and average housing (20-25 years old) along 
Pennington Road and vacant land characterize the area. Density 
per acre is 1.8 dwelling units. 



58 



Six of 49 houses (12%) are substandard. A major thor- 
oughfare has been proposed for construction in the southeastern 
portion of the area. 

One family is on Welfare; two juvenile crimes, two 
crimes against property and two against persons were reported. 






EVALUATION 

The data obtained from the analyses of neighborhoods 
on an individual basis does not clearly define any particular 
areawide pattern of blight. Therefore, the results of the 
sample survey have been totalled in order to be more represen- 
tative of all substandard dwellings throughout the Albemarle 
planning area. The following evaluation is presented, there- 
fore, to afford an overall view of the existing socio-economic 
pa t tern . 



43% are homeowners 

68% are white 

90% have four or more rooms 

91% have more than one bedroom 

Average family size was 3.5 persons per housing unit 

61% have hot and cold running water; 31% have cold 
only and 8% have neither 

81% have flush toilets 

737o have a bathtub or shower 

Average monthly rent, including utilities, is $42 

Estimated value of owner-occupied structure is $3,227 

52% of the residents are female 

106 children (of a total population of 475) were en- 
rolled in school 

The textile industry is the major employer 

70% of the employed used automobiles for transportation 
to work 

1967 average family income was $2,730 

15% of the residents are collecting either OAS I or 
ret ir ement 

2 7o of the residents are receiving Welfare assistance. 



59 



The survey form (and totals) are reproduced in the 
Appendix. However, the following should be noted: 



Owne r- o ccup ied units predominated in Neighborhoods 
1, 2, 6, 9, 14, Al, A4, A7 , A9 , and A12. Substandard 
structures are predominant in areas 7, 10, 12, 13, A2 , 
A7 , A9 , and A10. A general assumption is made, there- 
fore, that absentee ownership is a major cause of 
deterioration. 

Of the families interviewed, Negroes were in the 
minority. However, in Neighborhoods 12, 13, and A6 , 
all (42) interviewed were Negroes. Again, rental 
housing units are in the majority (29 of the 42) — 
further evidence of the problems associated with 
absentee ownership. 

Overcrowding (more than one person per room and/or 
bedroom) was not overly evident. The notable excep- 
tion was Neighborhood 12 in which 133 persons live 
and sleep in 129 rooms — about 1.03 rooms per person 
and 1.8 persons per sleeping room. 

All city residents had inside running water but 34 
of 108 families had cold water only. Twenty-four 
have neither bath or shower, and nine had no flush 
toilet. Fringe area interviewees reported, of 28 
total, seven without running water, eight with cold 
water only, fifteen with neither bathtub or shower, 
and fourteen did not have flush toilets. 

Average rent, including utilities, ranged from a low 
of $20 (Neighborhood A2) to a high of $72 (Neighborhood 
4). Those neighborhoods having the highest percentage 
of substandard units average about $38 monthly — 
which is not excessive. Estimated value of owner- 
occupied units ranged from $900 (Neighborhood A9) to 
$7,100 (Neighborhood 12). 

Age breakdown indicates groups 5-14, 15-24 and 55-64 
have the largest number -- indicative of the exodus 
of productive workers. 

Average family income ranged from $742 (Neighborhood 
A9) to $5,196 (Neighborhood Al); however, Neighborhoods 
1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, Al , A2 , A4 , A5 , A13, and 
A14 (15 of 28 neighborhoods involving 113 families) had 



60 



average incomes higher than the poverty level of 
$3,000 — evidence that poor management of income is 
contributing to place and condition of residency. 

Only 8 of the 136 families qualify for assistance 
from the Welfare Department -- indicating that many 
indigents do not qualify for public welfare assis- 
ance . 



The foregoing reveals that no particular pattern has 
occurred in the socio-economic indices. Although substandard 
structures are more evident in Neighborhoods 10, 12, A7 and 
A9 , these areas have average family incomes of $1,640, $4,158, 
$2,195, and $742, respectively. However, only three inter- 
views were made in Areas 10, 3 in Area A7 , and 2 in Area 9, 
whereas 34 were made in Area 12 — generally considered as 
being Albemarle's most blighted neighborhood. Also, two of 
three families in Neighborhood 10 had OASI or retirement 
incomes, 9 of 34 in Neighborhood 12 and 2 of 3 in Neighbor- 
hood A7 — indicative not of earning capacity but of totally 
inadequate r e t ir ement / d i sab i 1 i ty programs and not the "fault" 
o f Albemar le . 

It may be generally concluded that substandard housing 
in Albemarle has not substantially contributed to the socio- 
economic problems of the occupants. It appears that the reverse 
is true. That is, those residents with socio-economic problems 
may well tend to "favor" substandard housing because of eco- 
nomics, environment, etc. The major problems involve a lack of 
standard rental units, absentee owners not making necessary- 
repairs, and owner-occupants having insufficient income to 
renovate. There are, however, programs underway and proposed 
to help remedy these problems and are discussed in other 
sections of the report. 



61 



CURRENT ACTIVITIES 

A great deal of progress has and is being made in the 
Albemarle planning area relative to community improvements. 
Although there are certain obvious pockets of blight existing, 
it is not unreasonable to anticipate remedial action in the 
near future. Efforts being made at the local level are indi- 
cative of the overall awareness that remedial action is war- 
ranted. Significant achievements have been made in all "cate- 
gories" and there is no indication that either current or 
proposed blight elimination activities will not be carried 
out. Several programs currently in progress are summarized 
be 1 ow . 

ACTION PLANS 

The following is a brief summary of municipal action 
taken since the preparation of the Comprehensive Plan. More 
detailed examples are found in other sections of this study. 



Plans are now being made by the City Council to 
determine the feasibility of annexation. 

The Planning Board is reviewing the Land Development 
Plan and Zoning Ordinance and is considering revision 
of same in view of changing development trends. 

The Police Department has moved into new quarters -- 
the recently vacated and remodeled Post Office. 
Facilities in the basement are to be used by the 
Police Reserve, the State Bureau of Investigation 
and for an Emergency Operations Center under the 
direction of Civil Defense, 

A Workable Program for Community Improvement has been 
prepared and approved by the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development. 



62 



A revised Comprehensive Street Plan (Thoroughfare Plan) 
has been approved by the City Council. 

A new bridge has been constructed over Town Creek and 
the widening of West Main Street to West End has been 
comp le t ed . 

Installation of mercury vapor lighting for the im- 
proved section of West Main Street has been authorized 
with wiring to be placed underground. 

Approval has been given to a new contract with Duke 
Power Company for demand up to 25,000 kw . 

The City has contracted with Southeastern Engineers 
for a study of load centers in the electrical system, 
one phase of which would result in improving service 
to the River Haven section. 

In addition to installing several water and sewer 
lines, a fixed rate of cost per foot for street 
improvements, curb and gutter, and water and sewer 
lines is being established. This standard policy for 
assessments will involve a percentage cost payment by 
the property owner even though the development is not 
new. 

A Codes Review Committee has been authorized to study 
the 1965 Fire Prevention Code to determine need for 
rev is ing . 

A long-range water use engineering survey has been 
completed. This study details the City's existing 
water resources and anticipated water needs for the 
next 20 years . 

A consulting engineering firm has been retained to 
plan expansion of the City's filter plant, improve- 
ments to the water distribution system, and construc- 
tion of a new sewage treatment plant. (Anticipated 
improvements would include among others, a new intake 
pump at the Yadkin River, a new raw water line, a new 
raw water storage reservoir, a new 750,000 gallon 
elevated storage tank, a new 8 million gallon capacity 
sewage treatment plant, new outfalls, etc.) 



63 



SANITATION 



"Piggy-poke" plastic bags for use in garbage cans 
are now available for sale by the City to city resi- 
dents. An experiment conducted by the City last 
summer indicated that use of these bags results in 
more sanitary handling of garbage and lengthens the 
life of garbage cans by preventing liquids from 
causing rust. 



COUNTY WATER AND SEWER STUDY 

The Farmers Home Administration recently approved a 
grant of $12,500 for a water and sewer survey in 
Stanly County. The study will propose a plan whereby 
water could be made available from a central filter- 
ing plant to most areas not now served and possibly 
a plan for sewer service. 

The need for a countywide water/sewer system is evi- 
denced by the recent discovery of pollution in some 
Stanly County wells -- which may be the source of a 
virus that apparently caused a large number (250) 
cases of encephalitis type illness in the county 
during July and August of this year (1968). The 
source of pollution is not known, but there is evi- 
dence of increasing pollution of underground water 
resources over a large area in this general portion 
of North Carolina. About 26 wells in various parts 
of the county have received chlorine treatment because 
of pollution. Also, the North Stanly High School well 
was abandoned because of this. Obviously, a county 
water system, at least on a selected basis, is needed. 



HOUSING CODE 

The Building Inspector in Albemarle controls the most 
effective means of eliminating structural blight and 
encouraging compatible and aesthetic development. He 
is empowered to : 

— enforce building code regulations 
enforce zoning regulations 

— issue building permits 

— enforce the minimum housing code. 



64 



In April, 1968, Albemarle adopted a Minimum Housing 
Code which sets minimum standards for plumbing for 
all dwellings and apartments, minimum standards for 
light and ventilation; minimum requirements for elec- 
trical systems; minimum standards for space, use and 
locations; minimum standards for safe and sanitary 
maintenance; minimum standards for control of insects, 
rodents and infestations; instructions for handling 
garbage and rubbish; and sets the responsibilities of 
owners and occupants of dwelling units. The 

code has a separate section dealing with standards for 
rooming houses. 

The code provides for the appointment of a Housing 

Official to administer and enforce the law, and also 

provides for a Housing Board of Adjustments and 

Appeals, which shall be the last resort for any 

request, short of action in the courts. 

The code does not call for any radical changes in 
currently accepted construction practices in Albemarle. 
It does, however, provide a standard under which hous- 
ing now in existence can be judged and below which no 
new construction can be built. The code contains 
machinery for condemning dilapidated or badly sub- 
standard housing under certain conditions. 

Through October 10, 1968, 71 houses were inspected 
with 42 found seriously substandard and condemned, 
five met the terms of the code and 24 had minor defects 
needing repair. Eleven of these have already been 
repaired. Albemarle's systematic house code enforce- 
ment program is obviously producing results. 



PUBLIC HOUSING 



Construction of 200 units of public housing — 150 
regular housing units and 50 designed for elderly per- 
sons — is being planned. A study of available sites 
has been made by the Housing Authority but no specific 
sites have been chosen. An application has been sub- 
mitted to the Federal Government for an advance plan- 
ning grant to facilitate employment of an architect 
and land purchases. Cost of the units is expected to 
range from $13,000 to $14,000. 



65 



The public housing plans also include consideration of 
day care facilities in a community center, (A "private" 
day care center is being constructed on North Fourth 
Street by the Stanly Care and Training Corporation -- 
an organization of local business and professional men. 
The modern 50'x80' one-story building will contain 4,000 
square feet and will house rooms for four different age 
groups, Designed to accommodate 50 or more children for 
working mothers, the facility will also contain a lounge, 
reception room, sick room, toilets, kitchen, and storage 
facilities.,) 

Although Neighborhood 12 has the largest number of sub- 
standard housing units and should receive first prior- 
ity under the program, Neighborhoods 10, 7 and 13 should 
also be included in plans for public housing. 

Also, a project has been initiated for the construction 
of new, low-cost housing for approximately 70 low-income 
families in Stanly County through the Farmers Home 
Administration. A 30-acre tract near Harristown, between 
New London and Badin (northeast of Albemarle) is being 
subdivided and developed for this project. The housing 
will be financed through the FHA and range in price from 
$10,000 to $12,000. 



PRIVATE HOUSING 



A group of area contractors has scheduled meetings with 
the City Council and Planning Board to discuss the lack 
of standard rental housing (single and multi-family units) 
in the planning area. Hopefully, agreements will be 
reached relative to areas needing rental housing, zoning, 
streets, utilities, municipal services, annexation, etc., 
all of which may be used to complement such development. 

It is encouraging to note a "sudden desire" by some 
property owners to improve their properties -- particularly 
in South Albemarle, Recently, numerous applications for 
home improvement and new home loans have been submitted 
to local financial institutions. (One such organization 
has had about 50 applications within a recent two-month 
period.) Specific reasons for this rather unexpected 
activity are hard to determine. It can, however, be 
assumed that recent governmental actions -- e . g . , minimum 



66 



house code enforcement, proposed public housing 
actions, civic interest, etc., -- have helped awaken 
the interest and concern of area residents. Regard- 
less of the reasons it is a desirable and worthwhile 
pattern that should be encouraged to continue — 
particularly that of making local monies available 
to finance improvements. 



RECREATION 



Numerous improvements were made this summer in the 
city's recreation facilities. Some of these are: 

Rock Creek Park — reroofing bathhouses and concession 
stands, ballfield improvements, painting, grass seed- 
ing, tree removal, cleaning back underbrush and vines. 
Plans are to pave the driveway from the road into the 
pool complex, expand the parking areas and add new 
tennis courts. Also, a rifle club is to be formed in 
connection with existing activities at the rifle range 

South Albemarle — new ballfield, grass seeding, new 
paved ball court, new parking lot, additional play- 
ground equipment and picnic tables. 

West Albema rle -- installation of new playground 
equipment in a vacant lot on West Park Avenue. 

East Cannon Avenue — two acres developed as multi- 
purpose play area and picnic tables. 

Carolina Avenue — 8 acres cleared and will contain 
a new ballfield and parking lot. Plans for future 
development include tennis courts, basketball, volley 
ball, paddle ball, horseshoes, etc. 

Association of Christian Athletes organized in 
cooperation with Albemarle Senior High School Athletic 
Department . 

Area recreation involves planned improvements at 
Morrow Mountain State Park. The Division of State 
Parks of the North Carolina Department of Conserva- 
tion and Development has given top priority in the 
next biennium budget to $50,000 for renovations to 
the bathhouse and swimming pool. Second priority 
has been given to funds for renovating the park water 



67 



system and fourth priority to reworking the parking 
lots and paving. High priority was also given the 
rebuilding of fire, hiking, and bridle paths. Also 
an additional 285 acres were recently purchased, 
bringing the total park acreage to 4,420 acres. 



COURT HOUSE - LIBRARY 



Stanly County's Courthouse is obsolete a 
structurally sound nor spatially adequat 
not qualify for issuance of a building p 
minor repairs and extensive work would b 
to bring it up to building code standard 
fifteen county offices a re now located 
locations around Albemarle, a number of 
rented and/or inadequate buildings. How 
Board of County Commissioners has select 
South Second Street, about midway betwee 
South Streets for a new courthouse and j 
to a special bond referendum on December 
the courthouse site will encompass appro 
110,000 square feet which will be adequa 
building and for about 200 parking space 
the county government center. 



nd is neither 
e . It does 
ermi t for 
e required 
s . Also, 
in various 
them in 
ever , the 
ed a site on 
n Ma in and 
ail. Sub j e c t 

10, 1968 ,* 
xima te 1 y 
te for the 
s t o s erve 



A library bond issue*will be offered at the same time, 
but as a separate question because of North Carolina 
law. The new building will be constructed as a 
separate building in order to qualify for Federal 
participation. Local officials hope to obtain up to 
50% of the library's cost from this source. Present 
plans call for use of a portion of the land already 
owned by the county and occupied by the old Courthouse 
for the new library. 

Construction of these two facilities (4 million dollars) 
could provide needed impetus to the downtown improve- 
ments program. For example, the new cour t hous e- j a i 1 
would replace several old buildings along South Second 
Street from the Beal Clinic northward through the old 
Stanly General Hospital building. After completion 
of this project the old courthouse would be replaced 
by a new library building resulting in modernization 
of large portions of two blocks within the central 
business district. 



'Note: Referendum was approved. 



68 



VOCATIONAL WORKSHOP 



The Stanly County Vocational Workshop has been in 
operation since December, 1965, and offers training 
and rehabilitation for handicapped persons. The 
program has been well received and has active support 
from a number of local industries (e.g., Richfield 
Manufacturing, the Snyder Company, etc.), the Associ- 
ation for Retarded Children and the Albemarle Junior 
Woman's Club. The Association has begun construction 
of a new building to house the workshop on Greenwood 
Street near the North Albemarle Elementary School. 



INTERCITY GOVERNMENT COUNCIL 

An ambitious attempt to coordinate efforts and imple- 
ment improvements was made in August, 1968, by the 
Albemarle-Stanly County Chamber of Commerce and city 
and county officials. Problems and possible solutions 
to existing deficiencies in the cities and incorpor- 
ated areas in the county were discussed, and as a 
consequence of the meeting, the following steps as 
part of a "Total Development Program" were developed: 



RESULT #1 . The start of an Intercity 
Council was provided by the Albemarle- 
Chamber of Commerce. Invitations were 
officials representing every town in t 
representative was given an opportunit 
principle problems in his area. A dec 
for the same group to meet once a quar 
solutions of county and local problems 
and suggestions were pooled. The most 
voiced suggestions became part of the 
the Chamber of Commerce for 1968-69. P 
assigned to committees and work was be 
the most feasible and practical method 
ment . 



Go ver nmen t 
Stanly County 

extended to 
h e count y . Each 
y to mention 
i s ion wa s ma de 
ter. Possible 

we re discussed 

frequently 
program for 
rojects were 
gun to determine 
s for accomplish- 



RESULT #2 . The organization of 20 clubs into an Inter- 
club Council. Instead of overlapping their activities, 
the combined memberships are pooling their finances 
and are establishing programs to develop bea u t if i ca t ion 
of the downtown area, recreation centers for youths, 
job opportunities, job training, and a rehabilitation 



69 



center. A drive to encourage public interest in govern- 
mental and educational activities will be initiated. 
Subjects of discussion included: 

Search for labor to fill positions available in the 
county. Suggestions for resolving this difficulty 
were to obtain a list of the county's unemployed and 
contact them for training and upgrading. 

The need for a county water and sewerage system. 

A paved airport runway. (The present runway is a dirt 
strip and the airport is not lighted. An aviation 
committee has been set up to take action on this 
problem and private individuals have agreed to purchase 
standard landing lights. The city will install the 
equipment . ) 

More housing. (A housing committee was set up to work 
with local contractors and financial institutions to 
help remedy the shortage.) 

"Leadership and lack of knowledge about government 
operations by the people." (The Chamber of Commerce 
will sponsor a course in practical politics for the 
public as soon as possibe.) 

Heavily traveled Highway 52. (Splits several Stanly 

County towns and the Pfeiffer College Campus down the 

middle. Further investigation into the possibility 

of rerouting the highway and creating some type of 
bypa s s . ) 

Communication between the county, city and local 
communities must be enlarged so that a feeling of unity 
in the county can be realized. The Intercity Govern- 
ment Council was divided into committees to investigate 
solutions to the water and sewerage facilities -- 
which seemed to be a major problem.) 



COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM 

In cooperation with the General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, the Albemarle Woman's Club is participating in 
the Sears-Roebuck Foundation sponsored Community Improve- 
ment Program. The main purpose is to encourage self- 
help activities with analyzation of local needs and 
means of implementation the goal of the local unit. 



70 



CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 

OBJECTIVES AND GOALS 

The Neighborhood Analysis has been prepared to supple- 
ment other planning studies by providing more detailed data 
on the extent and causes of blight. Implementation of recom- 
mendations made should dovetail with comprehensive plans and 
result in an area-by-area action program for overall community 
improvement and development. 

Preceding sections have analyzed information on: 
structural conditions in residential and non- r es iden t ia 1 areas; 
characteristics of families affected by poor housing; adequacy 
of community facilities and services; and general causes of 
blight. Based on this, it is obvious that the cause and effect 
of blight in Albemarle is not easily defined. Although sub- 
standard housing appears to be the major problem, other socio- 
economic factors are also contributing to blight. With the 
exception of existing deteriorating and dilapidated housing, 
it is difficult to pinpoint any other major contributing 
factor. The families affected by poor housing are not, gener- 
ally, confronted with significant problems of disease, infant 
mortality, overcrowding, crime, low income, etc. There are 
pockets of these indices, but they are the exception rather 
than the norm. Also, non-residential blight is not overly 
evident and community facilities and services are, for the 
most part, adequate. 

In those instances in which remedial actions are most 
needed, such is either implemented or proposed. For example, 
enforcement of the minimum housing code and plans for public 



71 



housing are well underway; unemployment is practically non- 
existent and supplementary educational programs are established; 
and plans are being made to initiate a number of programs rela- 
tive to comprehensive elimination of the causes of blight. 

The types of actions being provided range from neigh- 
borhood residents taking action to eliminate blighting influ- 
ences to such programs of public action as code compliance, 
public improvements, Federally-aided public housing and compre- 
hensive planning — all in combination. Also, a Workable 
Program for Community Improvement has been adopted and is being 
implemented and, most important, citizen participation is being 
f o s tered . 

This is not to say that all Albemarle's problems are 
being solved. There are certain objectives and goals yet to 
be met. The more significant of these are: 



1) 
2) 
3) 
4) 
5) 

6) 



Improve home maintenance, including necessary repairs 
painting, yard bea u t if ica t ion , etc. 

Eliminate outbuildings such as sheds, garages and 
workshops no longer being used. 

Provide neighborhood improvement committees with 
assistance in formulating and implementing projects. 

Establish a technical institute to provide training 
leading to better jobs for the underemployed. 

Utilize funds from the Economic Opportunity Act to 
educate and train the underemployed and physically 
hand icapped . 

Countywide and/or regional economic development 
should be fostered as a cooperative project by all 
public and civic organizations. For example, one 
of the first steps should involve a comprehensive 
county planning program. 



72 



7) 



9) 
10) 
U) 



12) 
13) 

14) 
15) 



16) 



17) 



Banks, savings and loan associations, developers 
and businessmen should encourage home ownership 
and cooperate in providing needed rental housing. 

Federal grants (e.g., Open Space funds) should be 
used to help provide additional neighborhood recrea- 
t ion facilities. 

Vacant lots should be kept mowed and debris removed. 

Strip commercial zoning should not be permitted. 

Extensive use of buffers and parks should be used 
to separate existing (and developing) residential 
and educational development from commercial and 
industrial uses. 

Require all buildings within the city to connect 
with the municipal water and sewer systems. 

Access to water and sewer systems should be afforded 
fringe area residents in rapidly developing areas 
through extension of lines or annexation. 

An air pollution ordinance should be adopted and 
enforced . 

Sidewalks should be installed, at least along one 
side of the street, in the vicinity of schools and 
areas generating heavy pedestrian and vehicular 
tra f f ic . 

Continued enforcement of the existing zoning ordin- 
ance, subdivision regulations, building and housing 
codes, providing recreation areas (particularly in 
close proximity to blighted housing), adoption and 
implementation of the thoroughfare plan and the 
associated diversion of heavy traffic, will improve 
the present environmental conditions. 

Other needed environmental improvements include those 
involving minor streets, sidewalks, curbs, gutters, 
street lighting, landscaping, plants, signs, etc. 
These "features" are most noticably inadequate in 
areas of substandard housing -- particularly in close 
proximity to the older mills, South Albemarle, and 
older developed areas just beyond the city limits. 
Area beaut i f ica t ion projects would certainly help 
improve these areas as would enforcement of housing, 
building and related codes. 



73 



TREATMENT 

Albemarle's blighted areas are not difficult to locate. 
The older areas are now and will continue to be blight-prone 
unless immediate action is taken. Three types of "renewal" 
treatment are proposed. These are discussed and are shown by 
type on the Proposed Treatment Areas Map. 

Cons erva t ion is a method utilized for the protection of neigh- 



borhoods that are not yet seriou 
action requires close cooperatio 
governmental agencies and reside 
of conservation is to maintain a 
qualities of a neighborhood. Su 
continuing maintenance including 
painting, landscaping, etc. Loc 
ances, clean-up campaigns, etc., 
by which implementation can be a 
if properly applied, can halt bl 
thereby eliminating the need for 
expensive action. 



sly bl ighted . This 
n be twe en local 
nts . The basic aim 
nd preserve the better 
ch action involves 

minor r epa ir s , 
al codes and ordin- 

are some of the ways 
chieved. Conservation 
ight before it begins, 

more intensive and 



Rehabil itation is a method utilized to revitalize an area that 
already shows signs of deterioration. Substandard 
housing, code violations, unpaved streets and little 
or no new development characterize such areas. Re- 
habilitation is feasible only where such action is more 
practical or inexpensive than total clearance and re- 
construction. This method might involve demolition of 
certain buildings, installation of public improvements 
such as water and sewer line expansion, rerouting of 
traffic and additional recreation facilities. 



Redeve lopment is the most expensive method of bl 
and prevention. This is generally the 
and is applicable only when the neighbo 
reached the stage where it would be fin 
feasible to attempt normal revival meth 
areas normally are distinctly character 
pockets of substandard housing, poor st 
inadequate community facilities such as 
parks, etc., and high indices of bli 
both social and economic. Treatment co 
acquiring the properties, removing subs 
structures, and redeveloping the area i 
with a comprehensive plan. Redevelopme 



ight control 
last "resort" 
rhood has 
anc ia 1 ly in- 
ods . Such 
ized by 
reet des ign , 

school 
ght fa c tors , 
nsists of 
tandard 
n accor dance 
nt , (e.g. , 



74 



urban r enewa 1 
little "cash o 
up a lmos t ent i 
wa te r , sewer 1 
etc., -- tha t 
part of the no 
of such progra 
grant a s s is tan 
made to the Fe 
assistance. U 
must bear one- 
by both the ci 
utility imp rov 
to the city's 
program offers 
can actively r 
ment object ive 



projects) quite often involves very 
utlay". That is, local costs are made 
rely by improvements to the area — 
ine installation, street improvements, 
will be made (or should be made) as 
rma 1 improvements program. Major costs 
ms are financially supported by Federal 
ce. Therefore, application is usually 
deral Government for urban renewal 
nder the Urban Renewal Program the city 
fourth of the net cost, but funds spent 
ty and the state for street improvements, 
ements and other facilities can be applied 
share of the net project cost. This 

a feasible means by which the community 
edevelop. This method would help supple- 
s of the current public housing program. 



PRIORITIES 

Based on the analyses of blighting factors, each neigh- 
borhood has been assigned a rank priority. If the listed neigh- 
borhood has been assigned a number of 1, it has the highest 
number of blight indices of the neighborhoods under considera- 
tion. The methodology employed involved totaling each neigh- 
borhood's categorical numerical rating and dividing by the total 
number of indices (e.g., welfare, arrests, substandard housing, 
etc., to determine the average numerical rating. Where feasible, 
the different factors were weighted so that the outcomes would 
not merely be proportional to the major category (the number of 
substandard structures). Remedial actions should be programmed 
accord ingly . 



NEIGHBORHOOD 



RANK 



NEIGHBORHOOD 



RANK 



City 



12 


1 


A7 


1 


Fr inge 


10 


2 


A2 


2 


Area 


13 


3 


A10 


3 




7 


4 


A3 


4 




3 


5 


Al 


5 




1 


6 


A4 


6 




8 


7 


A13 


7 




9 


8 


A14 


8 




4 


9 


A8 


9 




14 


10 


A12 


10 




2 


11 


All 


11 




5 


12 


A9-9A 


12 




6 


13 


A6 


13 




11 


14 


A5 


14 





75 



Particular emphasis should be made in Neighborhood 12. 
This area has the most substandard structures and ranks foremost 
in total blight indicators. Furthermore, action programs should 
not be "limited" to the South Albemarle area but should encompass 
the entire neighborhood in order to remove indices of potential 
blight. The adjoining neighborhoods (10 and 13) should be in- 
cluded as part of this project. 

The problems confronting Neighborhood 7 are similar to 
those in 12, 10 and 13 in that blight or potential blight is 
rather widespread throughout the area. The major difference is 
one of deterioration rather than dilapidation — i.e., rehabili- 
tation as opposed to redevelopment is needed. 

Although social and economic programs should be initi- 
ally stressed in Neighborhoods 12, 10 and 13, they must also be 
coordinated with housing improvement programs — existing and 
proposed. However, it should not be the sole responsibility of 
area residents to render unto themselves -- assistance from all 
public and private sources must be made available. If not, 
progress may be hindered to such an extent that meaningful 
improvements cannot be made. 



AVAILABLE ACTION PROGRAMS 

In addition to those programs currently in progress, 
there are certain Federal assistance programs which could be 
applied to local problems. Among these are: 



Community Action Programs mobilize community resources to help 
families combat the problems of poverty, inadequate 
education, unemployment and dilapidated housing. 
Typical projects include such things as Head Start, 



76 



Upward Bound and health centers. Federal grants up 
to 90% of the cost of the program are made available, 
to establish and administer a program to private non- 
profit and public agencies. 

The Manpower Development and Training Program provides occupa- 
tional training for unemployed and underemployed 
persons who cannot reasonably obtain appropriate full- 
time employment without training. 

Operation Mainstream Program has as its purpose the establish- 
ment of work- t ra in ing and employment projects, aug- 
mented by necessary supportive services for chronic- 
ally unemployed poor adults. 

The Physically and Mentally Handicapped Employment Service 
provides direct employment counseling services and 
assistance to physically and mentally handicapped 
persons seeking work. 



The Neighborhood Youth Corps has three ma 
school program, and out-of-schoo 
summer program. The in-school p 
time work and on-the-job trainin 
high school age from low income 
program provides these students 
during the summer months. The o 
provides economically deprived s 
practical work experience and on 
encourage them to return to scho 
education, or if this is not fea 
acquire work habits and attitude 
their emp 1 oyab i 1 it y . 



jor programs: an in- 
1 program , and a 
rogram provides part- 
g for students of 
families. The summer 
with job opportunities 
ut-of-school program 
chool dropouts with 
-the-job training to 
ol and resume their 
sible, to help them 
s that will improve 



Another example of outside aid (available from the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development) involves code 
enforcement. Under this program cities and counties may obtain 
financial assistance (up to thre e- f ou r ths of program cost) to 
plan and administer concentrated code enforcement in selected 
local areas (South Albemarle, for example). These programs 
are both remedial and preventive, such as restoring properties 
and their environments to decent and standard conditions and 
arresting future deterioration. 



77 



The Open Space Land Program (Department of Housing 
and Urban Development) is another federal program which could 
be utilized to improve environmental conditions. This program 
provides up to 50% in matching grants to public bodies for 
acquiring, developing, and preserving open space land for per- 
manent public use, thereby helping to prevent urban sprawl and 
the spread of blight, and providing recreation, conservation 
and scenic areas. 

The Neighborhood Facilities Program (Department of 
Housing and Urban Development) provides grants to local bodies 
or agencies to help establish multi-purpose neighborhood 
centers offering concerted community health, recreational, or 
social services. Such facilities scattered throughout Albe- 
marle, particularly in those areas that are densely developed 
(e.g., around the "mill villages"), could supplement the commu- 
nity center being planned for the Carolina Avenue area. 

The Mortgage Insurance for Housing for Families of 
Low and Moderate Income Program (Federal Housing Administration) 
enables financing for construction, purchase or rehabilitation 
of s ing 1 e- f am i 1 y homes and one to four unit rental projects, at 
the regular interest rate for moderate income families and at a 
below-market rate of interest for lower income families. The 
Mortgage Insurance for Rental Housing for Families of Low or 
Moderate Income program provides insurance for financing con- 
struction of rental and cooperative housing of modest design for 
families of low and moderate income. The principal program is 
based on below-market interest rates. 

An example of a program which is available to help 
combat social problems in the Child Welfare Services Program. 
This program protects and cares for homeless, dependent or 



78 



neglected children and children of working mothers. It attempts 
to strengthen their own homes where possible, otherwise caring 
for children away from their homes in foster family homes or in 
day care facilities. Such services could be most effective in 
the South Albemarle area. 

These are only a few of the numerous programs available 
to improve conditions and facilities in any community. Infor- 
mation regarding these and others can be obtained from the N.C. 
Employment Security Commission, regional offices of the Bureau 
of Work Programs, or by reference to the Catalog of Federal 
Assistance Programs. The initiative should be provided at the 
local level, but any and all outside assistance should also be 
encoura ged . 






79 



Jd 



A- 



A 



^. 



in 



M 






A-3 



v 



X 



PROPOSED 

TREATMENT AREAS 




ALBEMARLE 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SCALE IN FEET 




LEGEND 
| J CONSERVATION 



REHABILITATION 
REDEVELOPMENT 



MAP-9 



APPENDIX 







SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
(Summer, 1968) 



ALBEMARLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



NEIGHBORHOOD IN- 
Address CITY 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 



Owner-occupied ( 42 ) 
Race of occupants: 
Number of rooms in unit: 
Number of sleeping rooms: 



Renter-occupied ( 66 ) 
White (66) Non-White (42) 
1 (1) 2 (1) 3 (10 )4 or more(95) 
1(10) 2(67) 3(23) 4 or more(5) 



Is there : 

Hot and cold running water inside the housing unit. (73) 

Only cold water inside. 

Running water on property but not inside unit. 

No running water. 



(34) 



(1) 



6 . 

7 . 
8. 



Is there a flush toilet in the unit 
Is there a bathtub or shower. 



Yes 
Yes 



(99) 
(84) 



No 
No 



(9) 



(24) 



Source of water/sewer 
City or mill system. 
Public sewer. 
Out side pr ivy . 



(108) 



Individual well or 

o t he r . 

Septic tank or 
cesspool 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 



13. 
14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 
18. 
19. 



Monthly rent (includes utilities). Average $4,600 
Estimated value of owner-occupied structure. Avera ge $3,895 
Sex breakdown: Male (173) Female (199) 



Age breakdown: 
Under 5 (55) 
5-14 
15-24 



(74) 



(66) 



25-34 
35-44 
45-54 



(29) 


(35) 


(54) 



55-64 (31) 
65+ (28) 



Number of children enrolled in school at present t ime . (81) 
Occupation of head of household. 



Text iles 


ma i or emp loyer . 


Occupation of any other 


workers . 


Textiles 


ma j or emp loyer. 



Method of transportation to work. Private auto. ( 47 ) 

Bus (6) 

Other (58) 



Approximate family income for 1967 Average $3,223 

Collecting Social Security or Retirement pay. Yes ( 55 ) No 
Collecting Welfare. Yes (6) No Number Type 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
(Summer, 1968) 

ALBEMARLE, NORTH CAROLINA NEIGHBORHOOD Fringe 

Address Area 

1. Owner-occupied (16) Renter-occupied (12) 

2. Race of occupants: White (26) Non-White (2) 

3« Number of rooms in unit: 1 2 3 ( 1 ) 4 or more (27) 

4. Number of sleeping rooms: 1 (2) 2 (13 )3 (13) 4 or more 

5 . Is there : 

Hot and cold running water inside the housing unit. ( 13 ) 
Only cold water inside ( 8 ) 

Running water on property but not inside unit. __^ 



No running water. ( 7 ) 

6. Is there a flush toilet in the unit. Yes (14) No (14) 



7. Is there a bathtub or shower. Yes (13) No ( 15 ) 

8. Source of water/sewer: 

City or mill system ( 7 ) Individual well or o ther (21 ) 

Public sewer ( 7 ) Septic tank or 

Outside privy ( 10 ) cesspool (11) 

9. Monthly rent (includes utilities). Average $34 

10. Estimated value of owner-occupied structure. Avera ge $2,373 

11. Sex breakdown: Male (56) Female ( 47 ) 



12. Age breakdo wn : 

Under 5 (15) 25-34 (8) 55-64 (16) 

5-14 ~ (19) " 35-44 ' (11) 65+ (7) 



15-24 (15) 45-54 (11) 



13. Number of children enrolled in school at present time. ( 25 ) 

14. Occupation of head of household. 



Textiles major employer 



15. Occupation of any other workers. 



Textiles major employer 



16. Method of transportation to work. Private auto (17) 

Bus 



Other (4) 

17. Approximate family income for 1967. Average $1,231 

18. Collecting Social Security or Retirement pay. Yes (18) No 

19. Collecting Welfare. Yes ( 3 ) No Number Type 



i l 



SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE 
(Summer, 1968) 



ALBEMARLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



NEIGHBORHOOD Total 



Planning Area 



9 
10 
11 
12 



13 

14 

15 
16 

17 
18 
19 



Owner- o ccup ied 



(58) 



Renter-occupied (78) 

White (92) Non-White (44) 



1 ( 1) 2 (1) 3 (11 )4 or more (122 ) 
1 (12)2 (80)3 (36)4 or more (5) 



Race of occupants: 

Number of rooms in unit: 

Number of sleeping rooms: 

I s there : 

Hot and cold running water inside the housing unit. (86) 

Only cold water inside. 

Running water on property but not inside unit. 

No running water. 

Is there a flush toilet in the unit. Yes (113) 



(42) 



(1) 



(7) 



Is there a bathtub or shower. 

Source of water/sewer: 
City or mill system (115) 
Public sewer (7) 

Out side pr ivy 



Yes (97) 



No 
No 



(23) 



(39) 



Individual well or other 
Septic tank or cesspool 



(21) 



(11) 



(10) 



Monthly rent (includes utilities). Avera ge $ 42 



Estimated value of owner-occupied structure. Avera ge $3,227 
Sex breakdown: Male (229) Female (246) 



Age breakdown: 
Under 5 (70) 

5-14 

15-24 



25-34 (37) 



(93) 



35-44 (46) 



55-64 
65 + 



(47) 



(35) 



(82) 



45-54 (65) 



Number of children enrolled in school at present time. (10 6) 
Occupation of head of household. 



Textiles major employer. 



Occupation of any other workers. 



Textiles major employer. 



Method of transportation to work 



Private auto ( 64 ) 

Bus ( 6) 

Other (62) 



Approximate family income for 1967. Average $2,730 

Collecting Social Security or Retirement Pay. Yes ( 73 ) No 
Collecting Welfare. Yes ( 9 ) No Number Type 



ill 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



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